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Things to do in Troon, Ayrshire

South Beach, Troon  © Dennis M Bradley

Troon sits on the Firth of Clyde on the west coast of Scotland in South Ayrshire. It is three miles north west of Glasgow Airport at Prestwick.

Sticking out on a small peninsular, the name "Troon" means "nose".

The natural harbor was developed and docks were added to serve the Duke of Portland's coal mines around Kilmarnock. The ballast dumped by incoming ships was used to create a protective shelter on the north side of the headland.

In 1812 a railway pulled by horses was built, but it was not permitted to carry passengers. To get around the rules, passengers were charged the same rate as freight. Troon later had one of the first steam railway lines as part of the Kilmarnock and Troon Railway.

Troon Harbour was an important part of the town's development with many small merchant ships built by Ailsa Shipbuilders.

Crosbie Church was first recorded in 1229 but was rebuilt in 1691. Legend has it that the roof blew off the day Robert Burns was born and it was left derelict thereafter. Crossbye means "place of the cross".

In the churchyard is the grave of David Hamilton, a supporter of Mary Queen of Scots. He shot the 1st Earl of Moray, James Stewart, in 1570 and it was probably the first ever assassination using a firearm.

Troon Parish Church was built in 1895 but the proposed spire was never completed.


Present Day Troon

Troon is a sizeable town with a port which is home to a fishing fleet, ferries, container freight services and a yachting marina. Ferries run to Campeltown and to Larne in Northern Ireland.

The town has a population of almost 15,000 at the 2001 census. The town has many local shops and cafés on the high street. Marr College is the town's secondary School.

Troon is well-known for the Royal Troon Golf Course which hosts the Open Golf Championship every seven years.

Famous residents of Troon are golfer Colin Montgomerie, rugby player Gordon Brown and footballer Jamie Ness.


Things to do in Troon

Golfers will enjoy playing on the links at the Royal Troon Golf Club. It has both the shortest and the longest holes in Open Championship golf. The 8th hole, known as the Postage Stamp is just 123 yards long and the 6th hole, the Turnberry, is 601 yards long.

The coast is ideal for yachting and kitesurfing as strong winds blow along the Firth of Clyde providing the right conditions for these exciting sports.

Each summer Troon hosts a music festival, Live@Troon, organised by a charitable trust to promote local musicians.

Troon looks out across the Firth of Clyde to the scenic Isle of Arran which can easily be reached by ferry from nearby Saltcoats.

Fullarton House was the grand home of the Duke of Portland. Although the house was demolished in 1966, the grounds are a beautiful park with ornamental pediments, walled gardens and stables which were designed by Robert Adam.

The remains of Crosbie Castle can still be seen in Fullerton Park. The castle was rebuilt three times but eventually the stonework was used to build Fullerton House. Only the dungeons now remain and were part of the ice house, kept cool by an underground stream.

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Things To Do in Troon



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