Towns in The West Country.

Abbotsham
Abbotsham is a typical North Devon village with a population of around 430 people. The village is just off the A39, about two miles west of Bideford.
Aisholt
The Saxon Village of Aisholt clings to the Eastern side of Somerset's Quantock Hills above Canning Brook roughly seven miles North of Taunton and six miles West of Bridgwater.
Alford
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Aller
Aller is a moorland village close to the river Parrett below the wooded ridge of High Ham. King Alfred baptised the defeated Danish King Guthrum here in 878. Later the moor witnessed one of the last battles of the civil war.
Altarnun
Angersleigh
Appledore
The delightful fishing village of Appledore sits at the estuary of the Torridge River, on the north coast of Devon.
Ashbrittle
West of Wellington and the River Tone, the parish of Ashbrittle takes its name from the ash trees and a Norman Lord Bretel (de St. Clair).
Ashcott
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Athelney
Aveton Gifford
Axbridge
Axminster
The ancient market town of Axminster, famous for its carpet industry, is five miles north west of Lyme Regis in East Devon.
Axmouth
Badgworth
Baltonsborough
Banwell
Barnstaple
Barnstaple is a town of just over 20,000 residents in North Devon. Situated on the banks of the River Taw, it is 34 miles northwest of Exeter.
Barrington
Barton St. David
Barwick and Stoford
Barwick village and the adjacent hamlet of Stoford lie south of Yeovil, near Yeovil Junction station. The park around Barwick House is dotted with strange follies including 'Jack the Treacle Eater' and the 'Fish Tower'.
Batcombe
Bath
The golden city of Bath has been welcoming visitors for over 2,000 years. Designated by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site, Bath presents some of the finest architectural sights in Europe.
Bathampton
Bathealton
The charming village of Bathealton lies hidden in high wooded hills.
Batheaston
Bathford
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Beckington
Bere Alston
Bere Alston is a village of some 3000 inhabitants set on the beautiful Bere Peninsular between the Rivers Tavy and Tamar on the borders of Devon and Cornwall.
Berkley
Berrow
Berry Head
Berry Pomeroy
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Bicknoller
Bideford
Bideford is a small port town in North Devon, on the banks of the River Torridge
Bigbury-on-Sea
The coastal village of Bigbury-on-Sea is in the South Hams district of South Devon, which is designated an "Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty".
Binegar
Bishops Lydeard
Bishopsteignton
Bishopsteignton is a large village of about 2500 people in South Devon overlooking the beautiful Teign Estuary. The land in the parish rises from near sea level to almost 250 metres at Haldon Hill, so the views are spectacular.
Black Torrington
Black Torrington is located within North Devon local authority area but is in fact in West Devon. It is well located for the local market town of Hatherleigh (5 miles) and for Greater Torrington and Bideford to the north.
Blagdon
Bleadon
Bodmin
Bodmin is situated on the western edge of Bodmin Moor, the county town of Cornwall for a century and a half, and mentioned in the Domesday Book. Bodmin is a busy market town, whose history goes back as far as the sixth century.
Boscastle
Boscastle is an entrancing beauty spot, lying between the rivers Jordan and Valency. The riverfront is bordered by pretty thatched and lime-washed houses giving on to the north coast harbour, with its 16th century quay.
Bossington
Bradford
Bradford on Tone
Bradford on Tone is an attractive village perched on a ridge above the River Tone. The village complete with shop and the White Horse Inn, retains much of its rural character with thatched cottages.
Braunton
Braunton is situated in north west Devon, midway between Barnstaple and Ilfracombe on the A361.
Breage
Brean
The village of Brean is situated between the popular seaside Town of Weston-super-Mare and Burnham-on-Sea in Somerset.
Brent Knoll
Brentor
Brewham
Brewham is a large parish comprising North and South Brewham, Border and Hardway, in what was formerly the Royal Forest of Selwood and is still a well-wooded river valley.
Bridgwater
Bridgwater was once ranked fifth among Britain's ports, schooners and sailing barges filled the riverside docks. Originally built to allow ships on the River Parrett a safe haven, the docks now welcome pleasure craft from the canal.
Bristol
Bristol - the Capital of the West Country - is famous for its tourist attractions, maritime heritage and excellent shopping. It has wonderful architecture, lots of engineering history, a first class university and great night life.
Brixham
Brixham is a natural port with breakwater protection from the sea and is first and foremost is a fishing port.
Broad Clyst
Broadway
Broadwoodkelly
Brockley
Brompton Ralph
Brompton Regis
Brushford
Bruton
Bruton is a picturesque little town on the river Brue, founded in Saxon times and retaining many intriguing glimpses of its past including Jacobean almshouses, Abbey remains and the famous Dovecot.
Bryher
Buckland Brewer
Buckland Dinham
Buckland Monachorum
Buckland St. Mary
Buckland St. Mary is set in the Blackdown Hills north-west of Chard. The parish includes NerocheForest, formerly medieval woodland and now managed by the Forestry Commission with a footpath trail to the site of an ancient hillfort.
Bude
Bude was once notorious for its shipwrecks, between 1824 and1674 more than 80 ships were wrecked on this coast. Today however Bude is best known as a seaside resort with fine sandy beaches, rock pools and tidal swimming pool.
Budleigh Salterton
Budleigh Salterton is a small town known for its quaint main street, which has a stream running down the side of it and small footbridges leading to each idyllic cottage.
Burnett
Burnham-on-Sea
Burnham-on-Sea sits on Bridgwater Bay in Somerset at the mouth of the Parrett River. Like many seaside towns along the coast, it was a small village until the boom of tourism in Victorian times.
Burrington
Butcombe
Butleigh
Butterleigh
Cadeleigh
Cadgwith
Cadgwith is a picturesque fishing village nestling on Cornwall's south coast near the Lizard peninsular (England's most southerly point.) It is loved by locals and tourists alike for it's peace, tranquillity and timelessness.
Callington
Callington is a market town nestling between the Tamar and Lynher rivers. The mural project on the walls of the town's buildings displays the area's heritage, landscape and industry.
Calstock
Camborne
Camborne was once at the heart of the former copper and tin mining industry in Western Cornwall. Today Camborne is a busy town best known for its famous School of Metalliferous Mining, one of the most respected in the world.
Camelford
The historic town of Camelford, is situated between the Atlantic coast and Bodmin moor. The ancient Slaughter Bridge is the legendary site of King Arthur's last battle.
Camerton
Carbis Bay
Cardinham
Carhampton
Carnbrea
Castle Cary

Castle Cary is a vibrant market town, with a winding main street, many of the buildings are of the local golden stone and some are still thatched.

Chacewater
Chapel Allerton
Chard
Two streams and a wide variety of good shops, flank the spacious High Street of the vibrant town of Chard. Its history since the 13th century is imaginatively recounted in the museum at Godworthy House
Chardstock
Charlestown
Charlstown is the familiar TV location for Poldark and The Onedin Line. The village was built in 1801 for the import of coal and export of China Clay; it remains an unspoilt port and retains its Georgian character.
Charlton Mackrell
Charlton Musgrove
Chawleigh
Cheddar
Cheddar is probably the most famous village name in the English speaking world and so widely recognised that many people do not realise that it is actually a place in Somerset. The only comparable village in Europe is the small village of
Chedzoy
Chelvey
Chelwood
Situated at the Eastern end of the picturesque Chew Valley, some 9 miles West of Bath and the same distance South of Bristol, Chelwood is mentioned in the Domesday Book and its name is derived from the Saxon Cellwert meaning Hill Farm.
Chesterblade
Chew Magna
The picturesque village of Chew Magna is set in beautiful Somerset countryside only a few miles from the City of Bristol
Chew Stoke
Chewton Mendip
Chilcompton
Chillington
Chinnock
Chipstable
Chiselborough
Chittlehampton
Churchill
Churston Ferrers
Clapton-in-Gordano
Clatworthy
Clevedon
Clovelly
Clovelly is a totally unique little fishing village nestled in its own little cliff-hanging nook on the western curve of Bideford Bay.
Clutton
Colyton
Combe Florey
Combe St. Nicholas
Compton Dando
Compton Dundon
Compton Dundon is really two villages. On Windmill Hill above Compton stands the monument to Admiral Hood, while Dundon Beacon is the site of an iron-age fort. Both provide interesting walks. Nearby is Turn Hill with extensive views across the levels.
Compton Martin
Congresbury
Cookbury
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Corfe
Corston
Cossington
Cothelstone
Cothelstone is a small rural parish at the foot of the southern slopes of the Quantock Hills (the first AONB) in Somerset.
Coverack
Coverack is a tiny fishing village with its single, curved harbour wall, built in the early 1700's and now sheltering a couple of dozen small fishing and pleasure craft.
Crantock
Creech St. Michael
Creech St. Michael is a delightful village with a 13th century church, which has a fine wagon roof and is well worth a visit.
Crewkerne
Crewkerne has been an important town since before the Norman conquest with some fine old buildings reflecting its prosperous cloth making past. Magnificent 15th century church. Bincombe Beeches nature trail rises from the town centre.
Cricket St. Thomas
Cricket-St-Thomas is as delightfully olde-English as its name suggests with a small community clustered around the quaint church. The local population of this Somerset parish was just 50 at the last count.
Crowan
Crowcombe
Croyde
Croyde, North Devon, England, is a magical place with superb sandy beaches, the village is steeped in old-world charm, and echoing the feeling of life in Britain in the 30's and 40's, when things were easy going.
Cubert
Cucklington
Culbone
In the far north west of Somerset there is an old saying that goes along the lines of: Culbone, Oare and Stoke Pero…Three Churches Parsons seldom go'.
Culmstock
Curland
Curry Mallet
Curry Rivel
The attractive village of Curry Rivel is of blue lias stone, perched on a low ridge above the levels, with several interesting shops and a church dating mainly from the 15th century.
Cutcombe
Dartington
Dartmoor Forest
Dartmouth
Situated on the south coast of Devon, Dartmouth is well known for its naval academy and scenic estuary of the River Dart which gave the town its name.
Dawlish
Dawlish is a brilliant place because it has so many thins to do! It has a long beach that never seems to end.
Delabole
Ditcheat
Dittisham
Dobwalls
Dobwalls is a small village three miles west of the market town of Liskeard in south east Cornwall.
Dodington
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Donyatt
Downhead
Draycott
Drayton
Duloe
Duloe is a small village about halfway between Liskeard and Looe. Perhaps its most interesting feature is in a field just across the road from the parish church of St. Cuby, a 5th century Cornish saint.
Dulverton
The Rivers Exe and Barle are daughters of the great Moor that represents the last true area of wilderness in Southern England 'Exmoor'.
Dundry
Dunster
Durleigh
Durston
East Budleigh
East Chinnock
East Coker
At East Coker picturesque 16th and 17th century farmhouses and almshouses cluster below the manor and church. Ancestors of the poet T. S. Eliot emigrated from here, and his ashes are interred in the parish church.
East Cranmore
East Harptree
East Looe
East Lydford
East Pennard
East Quantoxhead
East Worlington
Elworthy
Emborrow
Evercreech
Exeter
Exeter is one of Britain's oldest cities, the commercial and cultural centre of the south-west; the old county town of Devon.
Exford
Exmouth
The coastal town of Exmouth in South Devon is a popular destination for both tourists and retirees.
Exton
Exton, in Exmoor National Park, is a parish with a total population of 230 and that includes Bridgetown and the outlying farms. It's listed in the Domesday Book.
Falmouth
Falmouth is the leading south coast resort, and has the third largest natural harbour in the world. The setting is superb, with four bathing beaches and a bustling waterfront marina.
Farmborough
Farrington Gurney
On entering Farrington Gurney you are greeted by the Farrington Inn, a traditional English pub serving good quality food at a reasonable price.
Felton
Fitzhead
Fivehead
Flax Bourton
Flushing
Fowey
Fowey (pronounced 'Foy') is a historic seafaring town, with a network of narrow streets climbing up the hills. Once home of the 'Fowey Gallants' the fierce Fowey seamen who raided the coast of France during the Hundred-Year War.
Freshford
Frome
Frome is the most easterly of Mendip's five towns, and also the largest. It has had a long history as a market and agricultural town with, for many centuries, a flourishing cloth industry.
Germoe
Glastonbury
Glastonbury is well known, not only for its connections with the history of Christianity and the majestic ruins of its Abbey, but also for its association with the legend of King Arthur.
Goathurst
Godney
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Gorran Churchtown
Great Torrington
Great Torrington is a small town in North Devon with a population of around 13,000. It was built overlooking the steep sided valley of the River Torridge.
Greenham
Greenham - "Farm on the mill brook", is the perfect setting for walking or cycling. Hidden for centuries, nearby Cothay Manor has remained virtually untouched since it was built in the fifteenth century.
Greinton
Halse
Hardington
Hartland
The village of Hartland is in north west Devon, between Bideford and Bude.
Hartland Point
Haselbury Plucknett
Hatch Beauchamp
Hatherleigh
Hawkridge
Hayle
Heathfield
Helford
Helston
Helston is the 'quaint old Cornish town' of the Furry Dance, which is held each year, on Flora Day the 8th May. Dancers in costume, dance through the decorated streets, gardens and shops.
Henstridge
High Ham
High Ham is situated high on a wooded hill, with panoramic views across the levels. It has an interesting church with parts dating back to the Norman period and a 19th century thatched windmill unique in Britain.
Higher Wambrook
Hinton Charterhouse
Hinton St. George
Hinton St. George was for centuries the home of the Poulett family whose power and wealth built the schools, halls and artisans' houses to serve the estate. At least two cottages date from the 14th century.
Holcombe
Holford
Honiton
The charming town of Honiton in East Devon is 18 miles northeast of Exeter and was once a major stopping point for stage coaches en route from Exeter to Lincoln.
Hope
Hornblotton
Hugh Town
Huntsham
Huntworth
Huntworth is a delightful hamlet, which features modernised canal side cottages, which retain their original appeal. The Canal Bridge was rebuilt in the 1920's to ease the gradient for heavier traffic.
Hutton
Ilchester
Ilchester was once a major Roman garrison town on the Fosse Way and the county town of Somerset until the 19th century. Its past is echoed in the Georgian houses and town hall, which contains a fascinating museum.
Ilfracombe
The Victorian resort town of Ilfracombe is on the North Devon coast, 11 miles north of Barnstaple.
Ilminster
Ilminster takes its name from the fine Minster church, which towers above the multitude of small shops and narrow streets crammed with mellow hamstone architecture.
Ilton
Instow
Instow is a charming village on the north coast of Devon. It is situated on the Torridge estuary opposite Appledore, where the rivers Taw and Torridge merge before emptying into the Bristol Channel.
Isle Abbotts
At Isle Abbotts, the handsome tower of the parish church rises over this sleepy little village close to the river Ile. Across the river to the east lies Isle Brewers.
Isle Brewers
Ivybridge
Keinton Mandeville
Keinton Mandeville is the source of Keinton stone and birthplace in 1838 of John Henry Brodribb, who later became the famous theatrical manager and tragedian Sir Henry Irving. The house bears a memorial tablet.
Kelston
Kenn
Kennerleigh
Keynsham
Kilmersdon
Kilton
Leaving the A39 at the sharp bend you enter what was the continuation of the old road to Kilton. Kilton was an ancient settlement in Saxon times
Kingsbury Episcopi
Kingsbury Episcopi is a Hamstone village boasting an ancient lock up on the green, magnificent church and numerous small orchards.
Kingsdon
Kingston
Kingston Seymour
Kingston St. Mary
Nestling at the southern end of the Quantocks, Kingston St. Mary has several buildings of interest including the church and in the outlying areas are good examples of 16th and 17th century farmhouses.
Ladock
Ladock is a small, unspolied and charming village in the very centre of Cornwall. It has an outstanding pub, several excellent guesthouses and a superb group accommodation at Woodland Valley Farm.
Lambrook
Land's End
Langford
Langport
Langport was formerly a river port on the Parrett, the story of the town and river is told graphically at the Visitor Centre at the western end of Bow Street.
Lansallos
Launceston
Launceston was the capital of Cornwall until 1838. Situated in the north east of the county, built on a hill and dominated by the ruins of a Norman keep. This is thought to have been the inspiration for Chateau Terrible, in Malory's Morte d' Arthur.
Leedstown
Leigh upon Mendip
Lerryn
Lerryn is a place that one almost wants to keep secret so that it does not become a popular destination. A beautiful and unspoilt village in a steep sided valley, it lies at the tidal head of a tributary to the River Fowey.
Lilstock
Liskeard
Liskeard is a busy market town on a hill, once linked by canal to Looe. The part Norman Church of St. Martin is the second largest in Cornwall.
Litton
Lizard
This is England's most southerly point but it's less commercialised than Lands End. Whether visited on a bright, spring or summer day or in a mid winter mist there's an appealing quality of remoteness about the town.
Locking
Long Ashton
Long Load
Long Sutton
Long Sutton is a picturesque village with a much photographed church, towering impressively above the village green and a Quaker Friends' meeting house dating from 1717.
Looe
East and West Looe are joined by a Victorian seven-arched bridge, a holiday resort of character, with several beaches, a bustling quayside with a unique Banjo Pier. Looe offers good bathing, yachting, river and sea trips and is a shark fishing.
Lopen
Lostwithiel
Lostwithiel is today a quiet, charming market town, which was the capital of the Duchy of Cornwall in the 13th century.
Loxbear
Loxton
Luccombe
Lustleigh
Luxborough
Luxulyan
The village of Luxulyan like so many in the West Country is often referred to as a "churchtown" in that it consists of houses clustered around the 15th century parish church.
Lympsham
Lyng
Lynmouth
Lynton
Madron
Malborough
Marazion
Marazion is Cornwall's oldest charter town, it has a cluster of cottages set among winding streets and palm trees, which overlooks Mounts Bay.
Marhamchurch
Mark
Marksbury
Marston Magna
At Marston Magna the ground still shows tell tale signs of this settlement's long and fascinating history. The church contains traces of Saxon herringbone work and has a Norman font. A charming village to be explored on foot at a leisurely pace.
Martock
Martock is a large village worth visiting for its many old hamstone buildings - ornate houses, the Old Court House, Market House, Treasurer's House and parish church, the second largest in Somerset.
Meare
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Meavy
Mells
Merrymeet
Mevagissey
Mevagissey is the largest working fishing port in St. Austell Bay. Cob cottages spill down to the harbour walls from the steep valley a picturesque village and one of Cornwall's most popular tourist resorts.
Middle Chinnock
Middlezoy
Milborne Port
Milborne Port was once one of the most important towns in Somerset, with its own mint. Until 1832 it returned two Members of Parliament. Attractive old buildings include the market hall, Guildhall, church and fives court.
Millbrook
Sitting in a valley between Whitsand Bay and Kingsand/Cawsand, Millbrook is a historic part of South East Cornwall.
Milverton
Dating back to the Doomsday survey, Milverton is a large village which has been designated as a Heritage Settlement and (in part) a Conservation Area.
Minehead
The delightful seaside town of Minehead is on the north coast of Somerset, overlooking the Bristol Channel and backing onto the Exmoor National Park.
Misterton
Modbury
Montacute
At Montacute the continuous progression of history is clearly visible in the buildings and monuments of this important medieval village below St. Michael's Hill.
Morwenstow
Mousehole
Moushole (pronounced 'Mouzle') the name is thought to derive from a smuggler's cave south of the village. The village was once a major pilchard landing port and retains considerable character.
Muchelney
In medieval times Muchelney was home to an influential Benedictine Abbey. Excavations of the 10th century abbey and the preserved remains of the 15th century cloister and abbot's house are in the care of English Heritage and can all be seen.
Mudford
Musbury
Mylor
Nailsea
Nether Stowey
Nettlecombe
Newlyn
Newlyn is the largest fishing port in England and Wales and lies south of Penzance. The colony of artists who gathered to paint in Newlyn, became known as The Newlyn School.
Newquay
Newquay is Cornwall's most popular and liveliest resort, with magnificent beaches and a major centre for surfing. Climbing up behind the beaches are high cliffs with exciting caves, the best is at Porth Island, Newquay's original settlement.
Newton Abbot
Situated on the edge of Dartmoor National Park, Newton Abbot is a historic market town situated on the River Lemon.
Newton Ferrers
Newton St Cyres
North Barrow
North Bovey
North Bovey is situated in the middle off the northeastern quadrant of Dartmoor, about one and a half miles south of Moretinhampstead. The village has its church, pub and a water pump.
North Cadbury
The attractive village of North Cadbury is set amidst orchards and contains many stone built cottages, the handsome Elizabethan Cadbury Court and fine collegiate church built in 1470 with splendid bench end carvings dating from 1538.
North Cheriton
North Curry
The village of North Curry lies principally along a single street, with a central area at Queen Square dubbed 'the Pepper Pot'.
North Newton
At North Newton the church stands on the site of an earlier Saxon Structure. In 1963 the Alfred Jewel, a Saxon ornament and oldest surviving crown jewel, now displayed in the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, was found near the site.
North Petherton
North Tamerton
North Wootton
The pretty village of North Wootton is to be found in the centre of the triangle formed by Wells, Glastonbury and Shepton Mallet.
Norton Fitzwarren
Norton St Philip
Nunney
The village of Nunney, in the edge of the Mendip Hills near Frome on the border of Somerset and Wiltshire, is dominated by its striking moated, French-style castle.
Nynehead
The village name means "nine hide" and is derived from the Saxon word for a unit of land; a hide was equal to about 120 acres. Dominated by Nynehead Court, the village is in the centre of the vale of Taunton Deane.
Oake
Oakhill
Okehampton
Okehampton is an ancient town situated on the northern edge of Dartmoor, close to the highest point on Dartmoor, High Willhays.
Othery
Otterford
Otterford Parish is bisected by the B3170 road providing good links from Taunton and the M5 and from Honiton and the A30 trunk road. The unspoilt countryside is in the Blackdown Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.
Otterhampton
Ottery St. Mary
Ottery-St-Mary is one of the loveliest villages in East Devon. Lying ten miles east of Exeter on the River Otter, the parish has a population of over 7,600.
Padstow
Padstow is built on a hillside overlooking the Camel Estuary. Padstow was once considered the ecclesiastical capital of Cornwall, from the time St. Petroc arrived here from Ireland in the 6th century, and founded a monastery.
Paignton
Paignton is located at Torbay on the on the south coast of Devon<. With good rail links to London and a sunny climate, it is a popular destination for holidaymakers for weekend breaks and bucket and spade type family holidays.
Paulton
Pawlett
Pendeen
Pennymoor
Pennymoor is a lovely little village in the parish of Cruwys Morchard near Tiverton, mid Devon. There is a lovely inn in the centre of the village called the Cruwys Arms where the Pennymoor Singaround regularly meet to make sweet music. M
Penryn
Pensford
Pentewan
Penzance
Penzance is situated at the northwest corner of mount's Bay facing St. Michael's Mount. Penzance is a bustling town and harbour and has Cornwall's only promenade; the climate here is so mild that palm trees and tropical plants thrive.
Perranporth
Perranporth was a tin mining village in the 19th century; it is now a family resort with a 3-mile long beach, a popular place for surfing and sand yachting. Perranporth also has a golf course and boating lake and there are fine cliff walks.
Pill
Pillaton
Pilton
Pitminster
Pitney
Plymouth
Welcome to Plymouth, vibrant regional capital of Devon and Cornwall, thriving modern city, historic seafaring port and holiday centre with something for everyone.
Polperro
Polperro is a showpiece harbour village. Picturesque and tightly packed cottages tumble down to fish quay on the inner harbour, once packed with pilchard luggers.
Poltimore
Poltimore is a picturesque village on the outskirts of Exeter. It is a small but beautiful village with a cosy feel. The most notable thing about Poltimore is the Grade 2* listed building which lies on the outskirts of the village. Polt
Polzeath
Polzeath could be called Betjeman country; Polzeath was a favourite place of the poet the late Sir John Betjeman and extolled in his verse. The poet is buried at the Church of St. Enodoc on the sand dunes.
Porlock
Not too many years ago a national monthly magazine carried out a survey in which they concluded that Devon was the best English County to live in.
Port Isaac
Port Isaac has been a fishing port since the Middle Ages. Cottages line the steep narrow twisting streets and geranium filled alleys ('drangs') which run down to the harbour.
Portbury
Porthallow
Porthallow, situated on the south coast near the Helford river and Helston is a small village with a nice pub, a café and a few shops.
Porthcurno
The name Porthcurno, means 'Port Cornwall'. Porthcurno has an exquisite beach strewn with tiny white shells.
Porthleven
Porthleven is a holiday centre and working fishing harbour, with storm booms, a granite pier and small beach. There are waterfront inns, restaurants, and fish centre, galleries and craft shops.
Portishead
For anyone who served at sea between the 1920s and the end of the 20th Century the name 'Portishead' was always followed by the word 'Radio'. It was the best-known and busiest ship-shore station in the world.
Portreath
Postbridge
Explore Postbridge - in the ancient heart of DevonDiscover the tiny village of Postbridge, set deep in one of the wildest landscapes in England.
Praze an Beeble
Priddy
At 800 feet above sea level, the Mendip village of Priddy is one of those rare places that can fairly be described as being more than the sum of its parts. It is certainly a village of contrasts: it can be pretty and it can be bleak
Priston
Puriton
Puxton
Pylle
We have just received a description of Pylle from one of our readers. This description is currently being prepared for publication and will appear on this page within the next few days.
Pyworthy
Queen Camel
The Queen was Margaret of France, second wife of Edward Ist, who made the manor of Camel part of the marriage settlement in 1299.
Radstock
Redhill
Redlynch
Redruth
Redruth's architecture bears testament to its rich mining history, celebrated each June with Murdoch Day festival. The town centre has a cinema and range of shops.
Roche
Rockbeare
Rockwell Green
Situated to the west of Wellington, it was formerly known as Rowe Green often called "Rogue Green" because of its colourful inhabitants. Its present name relates to the brick well at the heart of the village.
Rode
Rodney Stoke
The village of Rodney Stoke is to be found some three miles East of Cheddar and 4 miles West of Wells either side of the A371 nestling on the higher ground between the Mendip Hills and the Somerset Levels.
Salcombe
Salcombe is a historic town in the South Hams district of South Devon. Streching along the banks of the Kingsbridge Estuary it has a sheltered harbour and a number of sandy beaches.
Saltford
Sampford Arundel
Seaton
Selworthy
Shapwick
The A39 Trunk Road from Bridgwater to Glastonbury is Roman in origin but this part of Somerset was developed long before the Centurion Cohorts arrived. Just to the north of the road lies the small village of Shapwick
Sheepwash
Shepton Mallet
The historic town of Shepton Mallet is set in the Mendip foothills, and at the geographical heart of the Mendip District. It was strategically important in Roman times (the Fosse Way, now the A37, passes close by)
Shipham
Shirwell
Sidmouth
Sidmouth is a lovely resort town on the south coast of Devon, 15 miles southeast of Exeter.
Somerton
Somerton is reputedly the 7th century Royal Capital of Wessex. The 17th century square, market cross, town hall, elegant houses and inns create an attractive townscape of outstanding architectural and historical interest.
South Brent
South Cadbury
South Cadbury lies at the foot of Cadbury Castle, the iron age hillfort reputedly King Arthur's 'Camelot'. It is said that on midsummer's eve the hill turns clear as glass and inside can be seen Arthur and his knights of the round table.
South Petherton
South Petherton was once of great strategic importance on the Fosse Way, this compact little hamstone town with its many small shops now has a quiet, unhurried charm. Fine church with an octagonal central tower.
Southleigh
Sparkford
Spaxton
St. Agnes
St. Agnes
The charming village of St. Agnes lies inland north of Truro. A mining village retaining links with its industrial past. Famous for the row of Stippy Stappy sea captain's cottages and surrounded by mine engine houses.
St. Austell
St. Austell is a bustling market town, situated at the centre of the Cornish china-clay industry. With the opening of the pits to mine the clay, St. Austel's population and prosperity soon began to grow.
St. Cleer
St. Decumans
St. Eval
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St. Ewe
St. Giles on the Heath
St. Helier
The port town of St Helier is the capital of the Bailiwick of Jersey, the largest of the Channel Islands, located just off the Normandy coast of France.
St. Ives
St. Ives is magnificently situated, overlooking a spectacular crescent of beaches. St Ives grew up around a small chapel built by St. Ia in the sixth century. The productive waters around St. Ives made it an important fishing port.
St. Just in Penwith
St. Just in Penwith is the mainland's most westerly town, situated next to Cape Cornwall. The town was once a centre for tin and copper mining, and is rich in antiquities.
St. Just in Roseland
St. Just In Roseland has an exquisite 13th century Church set above the tidal creek of the Percuil River. The beautiful Churchyard, which slopes down steeply from the road, is luxuriantly planted like a sub-tropical garden.
St. Mawes
St. Mawes is a fashionable yachting resort beautifully situated, it lies in a sheltered spot on the Roseland Peninsula overlooking Falmouth. The lovely houses, some of them thatched, that lie along the waterfront look east to the bay.
St. Minver
St Minver is a tiny parish and village on the Camel river estuary in North Cornwall.
Staple Fitzpaine
Starcross
Starcross is a small, mainly commuter, village on the estuary of the River Exe, about eight miles south of Exeter.
Stawell
Stawley
Stithians
Stockleigh Pomeroy
Stocklinch
This beautiful and thriving village some three and a half miles North East of Ilminster dates back to medieval times.
Stogumber
Stogursey
Stoke Fleming
Stoke Gabriel
The delightfully named village of Stoke Gabriel is in one of the most unspoilt parts of South Devon. It is situated on the banks of a small creek which is a tributary of the River Dart.
Stoke St. Gregory
Stoke-sub-Hamdon
Stoke-sub-Hamdon stretches round the northern rim of Ham Hill.
Stokeinteignhead
This is the thatched village you dream about staying in. Its in a wide valley bottom surrounded by round hills like dumplings of field and wood. It smells of apple orchards and warm grass.
Stolford
Stowel
Stowey
Stowford
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Stratton-on-the-Fosse
Street
Street is just to the south of Glastonbury, and owes much of its more recent development to the influence of Clarks, the world famous shoe manufacturers.
Sutton Mallet
Sutton Montis
Swainswick
Swainswick or Swanswick or Swayneswycke is a quite small village spreading itself down the old A46 road from Upper Swainswick to Lower Swainswick.
Taunton
Taunton - The County Town of Somerset - Nestling in a valley at the foot of the Quantock and Blackdown Hills. "King Ina" founded Taunton; the town on the River Tone has found itself at the centre of many bloody rebellions.
Tavistock
Tavistock sits on the edge of Dartmoor, about 15 miles north of Plymouth in Devon.
Teignmouth
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Templecombe
Templeton
Tetcott
Thelbridge
Thorn Falcon
Thorverton
Thurlestone
Thurloxton
Timberscombe
Timsbury
Tintagel
Tintagel, is the legendary birthplace of King Arthur. An Iron Age castle and settlement preceded the 13th century castle whose ruins can still be seen.
Tintinhull
Tiverton
Tolland
Torquay
Torquay has been a favourite holiday resort for generations, superbly situated in beautiful Torbay, at the heart of the English Riviera in the county of Devon.
Totnes
Treborough
Tresco
Troon
Trull
Truro
Truro is Cornwall's commercial and administrative centre. Truro became fashionable during the 1800's with rich merchants whose wealth came from tin mining, at the same time it was the hub of county society.
Trusham
Twitchen
Tywardreath
Tywardreath is in mid Cornwall on the south coast, not far from St Austell and 3 miles south of Fowey. It has magnificent footpaths along the coast and is only a five minute walk from the beach at Par. The city of Truro is 12 miles to the
Ubley
Uffculme
Ugborough
Ugborough Parish The South Hams was thinly populated when the English came south from Dartmoor. Unlike Cornwall there is little Celtic influence. The Anglo-Saxon settlers were agricultural rather than seafaring and by the mid 6th century
Umberleigh Bridge
Umberleigh North Devon in the Parishes of Chittlehampton and Atherington Umberleigh is a quiet village set around the old three arched Umberleigh bridge, by the river Taw (Tarka the Otter). only 6 miles from Barnstaple on 377 Exeter road
Uphill
Upton
Upton Noble
Veryan
Veryan is best known for the five 19th century round thatched houses, each with a cross on top; they stand two at either end of the village and one in the centre.
Walton
Walton-in-Gordano
Wambrook
Wanstrow
Watchet
Watchet is one of those places that attract the loyalty, love and devotion of some and the complete indifference of others. It can look pretty one day and pretty bleak the next, it can be bustling with activity or seemingly deserted.
Weare
Wedmore
Wedmore is one of the gems of the fair county of Somerset and represents the very best that a thriving English village has to offer. It was here in the year 878 that King Alfred the Great made peace with the Danish King Guthrum.
Wellington (Somerset)
Wellington is a friendly town set in a wide valley between the beautiful Blackdown Hills, seven miles west of Taunton on the River Tone. The name is synonymous with the famous "Iron Duke" victor of the battle of Waterloo.
Wellow
Wells
Wells qualifies as England's smallest and Somerset's only city, because of its magnificent cathedral. It lies beneath the southern slopes of the Mendip Hills, and provides a wealth of historical interest and beautiful architecture.
West Anstey
West Bagborough
West Buckland
The village has been extended during the past century and at its western edge on a small hillock stands the church of St. Mary whose tower, beautifully illuminated at night, is a landmark for miles around.
West Chinnock
West Coker
West Cranmore
West Harptree
West Hatch
West Lydford
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West Monkton
West Pennard
West Quantoxhead
Westbury
Weston Zoyland
The year 1685 may seem a long time ago to anyone living in the early 21st century, but as a time-span it is actually less than 3 times the age of our oldest citizen.
Weston-in-Gordano
Weston-Super-Mare
Weston-on-Sea, or Weston-super-Mare as it is better known, is a large seaside resort in Somerset. Its broad flat sandy beach is on the Bristol Channel, 18 miles southwest from Bristol itself.
Westward Ho
The seaside resort of Westward Ho! is a popular North Devon holiday destination with a long sandy beach. It is the only town in the UK to have an exclamation mark in its name.
Whitchurch
Wick St. Lawrence
Widecombe in the Moor
Williton
Wilton
Wincanton
The charming market town of Wincanton overlooks the Blackmore Vale. Elegant Georgian houses and coaching inns record its former importance as a staging post on the main road from London to Plymouth.
Winford
Winkleigh
Winsford
Winsham
Winsham is a thriving village on the river Axe close to the Dorset border, retaining its shop, pub and church.
Withleigh
Withycombe
Withypool
Wiveliscombe
The historic market town of Wiveliscombe, locally known as "Wivey" is situated on the edge of the Brendon Hills, it is a thriving rural community with many local services and a surprising range of businesses.
Wookey
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Woolacombe
Woolacombe is a traditional small seaside resort in the County of Devon. It is located in the parish of Mortehoe; close to the western perimeter of the Bristol Channel, opposite the Atlantic Ocean.
Woolverton
Worle
Wraxall
Wrington
Yarlington
Yatton
Yeovil
Yeovil is the major town of South Somerset with the best shopping centre in a very wide area, the Octagon Theatre, Goldenstones Pools and Leisure Centre, a multi-screen cinema, a ski centre and the wooded parkland at Ninesprings
Yeovilton
Zeal Monachorum
Zennor
Zennor is an enchanting moorland village west of St Ives. The twelfth century church has the famed bench end carving of 'the mermaid of Zennor'.

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