Towns in The Heart of England.

Ab Lench
Abbey Dore
Abbots Bromley
Abbot's Bromley, an attractive village south of Uttoxeter has an ancient church, and several typical, Staffordshire half timbered cottages. It is famous for the Abbot's Bromley Horn Dance, a tradition going back to medieval times
Abingdon
You are walking with the past when you visit Abingdon. Sometimes the Thames, which flows under the ancient bridge here, brings with it a mysterious fog.
Acton Burnell
Acton Scott
Acton Scott is an ancient village below the slopes of Ragleth Hill, and the home of the Scott family for centuries.
Adderbury
Admington
Alcester
Alcester is an ancient Roman town in southwest Warwickshire. Lying seven miles west of Stratford-upon-Avon, it has plenty of architectural attractions for visitors to enjoy without the crowds.
Alderton
Alderwasley
Alderwasley is a very small village just a mile from the Derwent valley Heritage Site. There are lots of walks and fantastic views from the hill tops. There is one pub with real ale and food in the village and three more locally at Belper
Aldridge
Aldridge is a very attractive town, in which each neighbourhood is very well looked after, with trees and well cut grass. There is also a beautiful church, a library, and a tree-lined courtyard including a children's play area.
Aldwincle
All Stretton
All Stretton is the northernmost of the three Strettons that are strung out along the road from Shrewsbury to Ludlow below the sprawling bulk of the Long Mynd.
Allestree
Alrewas
The village of Alrewas is a charming backwater in Staffordshire, five miles north of Lichfield.
Alton
Mention the village of Alton in Staffordshire, and Alton Towers springs readily to mind. Alton is just minutes away from this well-known theme park.
Alveley
Alveston
Ambrosden
Amersham Old Town
Amersham Old Town is popular with visitors and locals alike, the town has a wide sweeping High Street, half timbered buildings, picturesque period cottages and a wonderful selection of exclusive designer and craft shops.
Ampthill
The ancient market town of Ampthill is situated under the brow of the Greensand Ridge. It is a town that enjoys the rural surrounds of open and wooded countryside, interspersed by small attractive villages.
Anslow
The ancestors of Anslow were forest dwellers, a hamlet in part of the once great Needwood Forest, land owned by the Mosely family.
Anstey
Anstey's role as a southern gateway to the Charnwood Forest is shown by the 15th century Packhorse Bridge, just a mere 5 feet wide, straddling Rothley River.
Appleford
Arlingham
Arlingham is a delightful unspoiled village in the Horseshoe Bend of the River Severn. Off juncton 13 of the M5, head for Frampton on Severn then go straight through the vilaage, keep left over the canal for 3 m.
Ashbourne
Ashbourne is one of the finest old towns in Derbyshire. Known as the Gateway to Dovedale.
Ashby de la Zouch
The unusual name of Ashby de la Zouch is derived from the Breton nobleman, who inherited the estate through marriage in the 12th century. Ashby developed into a Spa town in the 19th century.
Ashby St Ledgers
Ashford
Ashford Carbonel
Ashover
Ashton
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Ashton under Hill
Nestled on the slopes of Bredon Hill, the rural village of Ashton-under-Hill has much to offer for the huge variety of people who inhabit and visit it.
Aslockton
Aspley Guise
Aspley Guise is an attractive village situated amongst sandy hills on the edge of the pinewoods of Aspley Heath.
Aston
Aston Flamville
Aston Flamville - The small church of St. Peters was considerably rebuilt in 1874, but retained one of the original Norman windows.
Aston Ingham
Aston Pigott
Aston Pigott is a small hamlet located approximately 13 miles west of Shrewsbury and just off the Shrewsbury to Montgomery road. It consists of three working farms called Aston Pigott Farm, Hole Farm, and The Grove Farm.
Aston Rowant
Atcham
Atherstone
Attenborough
Audley
Austrey
Situated at the northernmost tip of Warwickshire, surrounded by rural Leicestershire, Staffordshire and South Derbyshire, Austrey is only two miles from the National Forest.
Aylesbury
Aylesbury, the county town of Buckinghamshire, is a lively market town steeped in history. Located at the foot of the Chiltern Hills and at the heart of the rich agricultural Vale of Aylesbury.
Badger
Bakewell
Bakewell is a pleasant old town and has numerous tea-shops offering cream teas with the famous Bakewell Pudding. The town was largely re-built in a surge of prosperity in the early 19th century caused by the expansion of industry.
Banbury
Banbury, a historic and lively market town - famous for its nursery rhyme, 'Ride a Cock Horse to Banbury Cross'
Barby
Barlborough
Barlborough is an ancient village mentioned in the Domesday Book.It contains estate houses built by the Rodes family. The village cross and church date back to Norman times.
Barnby Moor
Barnt Green
Barnwell
Barrow-on-Soar
Barrow is on the east bank of the Soar, with good mooring and shopping facilities, a pleasant stopping point for boaters. Barrow can trace its roots back to at least Roman times. The much restored Holy Trinity Church is of 14th century origin.
Barrowden
Barsby
Barston
Barton-under-Needwood
Barton-under-Needwood is a large, attractive and friendly village located just off the A38 in Staffordshire. The village has several facilities including shops, a library, bank and several pubs.
Baslow
Beaconsfield
The picturesque town of Beaconsfield is divided into two separate and distinct parts - the old and the new. The attractive old town, is flanked by former coaching inns and old buildings.
Beckingham
Bedford
Bedford is the charming county town of Bedfordshire, 30 miles west of Cambridge.
Bedworth
Formerly a small mining town, Bedworth has grown considerably as a sought-after residential town largely due to transport links to major cities such as Coventry and Birmingham.
Beeston
Belper
Benefield
Bengeworth
Benson
Berkeley
Bewdley
Bewdley is a small town set in the heart of the Severn Valley. The towns history can be traced hundreds of years back, when Bewdley was England's second largest town.
Bibury
Seven miles north-east of Cirencester, Bibury is on the southern edge of the Cotswolds Area of Outstanding National Beauty.
Bicester
Bicester - of Saxon origin (not Roman, despite the spelling), is a traditional and thriving market town, known for being the fastest growing town in Oxfordshire.
Biddulph
Biggleswade
The name Biggleswade is derived from Biccel - an Anglo-Saxon personal name and waed, an old English word for ford. The Great North Road and the waterways gave rise to Biggleswade's early prosperity.
Bilsthorpe
Bilston
Birdingbury
Birley
Birmingham
Birmingham is Britain's second largest city and is situated right in the heart of England. Friendly, bustling and thriving, Birmingham is one of our most visited cities and welcomes visitors all year long.
Birstall
Birstall has become a major dormitory area for Leicester, but there are several examples of its earlier history in evidence.
Bishop's Castle
On the edge of the Clun Forest, is the ancient market town of Bishop's Castle, the town retains its medieval outline and has a long and fascinating history.
Bishops Cleeve
The large village of Bishops Cleeve is situated at the bottom of Cleeve Hill, three miles north of Cheltenham in the picturesque Cotswolds.
Bishops Frome
Bishops Tachbrook
Bishops Tachbrook is a small rural village, situated near to Royal Leamington Spa and Warwick, situated close to the M40 motorway.
Blaby
Much of the older part of Blaby village has been designated as a conservation area. It includes the 12th century parish church of All Saints, a thatched and timbered inn dating from about 1485.
Blatherwycke
Bletchley
Bletchley in Buckinghamshire is five miles south of Milton Keynes, close to the A5 and the M1 motorway.

Bletsoe
Blewbury
Blisworth
Blisworth a beautiful village in South Northamptonshire. The village contains St John The Baptist C.O.E church dating back to the twelfth century. And the area is surrounded by deep, lush Northamptonshire countryside. The Grand Union Ca
Bloxham
Bolsover
Bolsover is a small town which was mentioned in the Domesday Book as the property of William Peverel, a Norman knight who fought in the Battle of Hastings.
Bonsall
Bonsall is a beautiful, quiet, rural village set within the idyllic countryside of the Peak District. Traditional limestone cottages adorn windy streets, Bonsall is a village with a history that goes back many centuries.
Bourton
Bourton-on-the-Hill
Bourton-on-the-Hill is a charming Cotswold village in a beautiful area of Gloucestershire. From its hillside location it overlooks the larger village of Moreton-in-Marsh on the famous Fosse-Way.
Bourton-on-the-Water
Bourton-on-the-Water is one of the showpieces of the Cotswolds, its picturesque beauty and charm make it a favourite place for visitors. The sparkling clear water of the River Windrush flows through the main street.
Bow Brickhill
Situated at the south east corner of the new city of Milton Keynes, the village of Bow Brickhill nestles into the hillside, adjacent to large areas of woodland.
Bozeat
Brackley
Bradbourne
Situated in the southeast of Derbyshire's picturesque Peak District, the ancient village of Bradbourne is five miles northeast of Ashbourne, just off the A5056
Brampton Bryan
Brampton Bryan is a small village located on the northern boundary of Herefordshire, near the borders of Shropshire and Wales.
Bramshall
Bramshall is a pleasant village which lies just 2 miles west of the market town of Uttoxeter. The village benefits from its hilltop location, that provides views over the surrounding countryside, and in particular, of the Weaver Hills.
Branston
Branston on the River Trent is a pleasant place to live, with its fine golf course, a wealth of restaurants and public houses and comfortable housing with well kept gardens.
Brassington
Braunston
Breedon on the Hill
Bridgnorth
The half-timbered buildings, the markets, shops and inns of Bridgnorth have welcomed and enchanted visitors for centuries.
Brightwell Baldwin
Brigstock
Brinklow
Brinsley
Brixworth
Broadway
The show village of Broadway lies at the foot of the Cotswold Edge. Renowned the world over for its picturesque beauty, Broadway has been welcoming tourists since the 19th century.
Broadwell
Bromham
Bromsgrove
Bromyard
Bromyard is a real, old-fashioned market town where everyone is friendly and the shops are stuffed with the wildest variety of goods you can imagine.
Brooksby
Brooksby is now home to the county's Agricultural College, but was once the seat of the Villiers family. Its most famous son, George, born in 1592 at Brooksby, rose to be the favourite of two Stuart monarchs.
Broseley
Broughton
Bubbenhall
Bubbenhall is a small to medium sized village in the district of Warwick in the county of Warwickshire. It has a long history and a good number of historic buildings remain.
Buckingham
Buckingham, dating back to Saxon times, the town can boast that it was once granted a charter by the legendary Alfred the Great. The enchanting Georgian buildings of the town centre are enlivened by the unique Old Town Gaol and Town Hall.
Buckland
Bucknell
Bugbrooke
Bulkington
Bulwick
Burbage
Burford
Burford is situated in north Oxfordshire, twenty miles north of Oxford, and is considered the southern gateway to the Cotswolds.
Burnham
Burnham is an ancient township that was referred to in the Domesday Book. North of the village lies Burnham Beeches, purchased in 1880 by the Corporation of the city of London, for use by the public 'forever'
Burntwood
Burrington
Burslem
Burton Joyce
Burton Latimer
Burton Overy
Burton upon Trent
Burton upon Trent, the largest town in the National Forest, is internationally known as the capital of British brewing. The River Trent and the Trent and Mersey canal wind their way majestically through the town.
Buscot
Buxton
The market town of Buxton is the highest town in England at 1,000 feet (307m) above sea level. It is a historic spa town in Derbyshire, famous for its spring waters.
Byfield
Byton
Caddington
Calton
Campton and Chicksands
Cannock
Cannock is the largest town on Cannock Chase in Staffordshire. It is situated in an area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, nine miles north east of Wolverhampton.
Cardington
Cardington is a quiet village among the Shropshire hills. It was founded in Saxon times, and is mentioned in the Domesday Book as the property of the Viscount Rainald, the greatest of all the nobles who owned the Earl of Shrewsbury
Cardington
Carlton
Carlton is a small town in Nottinghamshire, four miles north east of the city of Nottingham.
Carsington
Although Carsington is not by any standards, one of the nicer parts of the Peak District, the reservoir does provide a feature worth visiting.
Castle Ashby
Castle Bromwich
Castle Bromwich retains a village atmosphere despite growing in size over recent decades and forming part of the Solihull Metropolitan Borough. Centred around a village green given to the residents by Viscount Newport.
Castle Frome
Castlemorton
Castleton
Chacombe
Chaddesley Corbett
Chadshunt
Chalfont St. Giles
Chalfont St. Giles is a small and very historic village, famous for its connections with John Milton, who lived here whilst fleeing from the Plague of London
Chalfont St. Peter
Chalfont St. Peter, often described as the gateway to the Chilterns, is a picturesque village situated at the South East corner of the Chiltern district.
Chapel en le Frith
Chartley Castle
This is the story of Chartley, a prehistoric encampment since the dawn of Time. The ground upon which it stands has yielded up bronze age weapons proving that from the earliest of times, the instinct to get up on the high ground was conside
Chatterley
Cheadle
Checkendon
Checkley
Cheddleton
Chelmorton
Cheltenham
Cheltenham is one of Britain's finest Spa towns, set in a sheltered position between the rolling Cotswold Hills and the Severn Vale, it enjoys a mild and pleasant climate. Cheltenham became famous as a Spa in the late 18th century.
Chelveston
Chenies
Chenies is a picturesque village with a pretty green, surrounded by an old school, chapel and ancient parish church.
Chesham
Chesham is the largest town in the Chiltern district, located amidst the steep green Chiltern Hills.
Chesterfield
Chesterfield is Derbyshire's largest town, situated close to the M1 and on the rivers Rother and Hipper.
Cheswardine
Chetwynd
Chinnor
Chipping Campden
The historic town of Chipping Campden in north Gloucestershire is a Mecca for visitors, from home and abroad. Chipping Campden is set on the edge of the Cotswolds.
Chipping Norton
To the visitor passing through Chipping Norton seems just like any other Cotswold Town, honey coloured cottages and quaint back lanes with old buildings, but it holds a secret
Church Leigh
Church Stretton
Church Stretton's glorious setting in a narrow valley earned the name 'Little Switzerland' from the Victorians when they tried to establish it as a spa, and visitors today are still refreshed by its beauty.
Cinderford
The town at the heart of the Forest of Dean. Cinderford grew up at the point where the Littledean to Coleford Road crossed Bideford Brook (known also as Cinderford or Soudley Brook).
Cirencester
Cirencester is a busy market town, situated in the southern Cotswolds, often referred to as the Capital of the Cotswolds.
Clarborough
Claverley
Clay Cross
Clay Cross began as a mainly farming community until in 1837, whilst George Stevenson was building his railway from Leeds to Derby, tunnelling began beneath the town and found vast deposits of coal and iron ore were found.
Cleobury Mortimer
Cleobury Mortimer - (pronounced Clibbery) The name derives from the great Norman family of Mortimer established here in 1086.
Clifton
Clifton Hampden
There's something wonderfully English about Clifton Hampden. On a blustery day, the swifts snapping up the mayfly, cow parsley almost at shoulder height
Clifton upon Dunsmore
Clifton upon Teme
Clipstone
Clophill
Lying in the Vale of the River flit, surrounded by woodlands is the village of Clophill. Entrance to the village from the A6, takes you past the Flying Horse pub, an important station during the stage coach era.
Clun
Clun is a town in miniature, lying in the valley of the River Clun. The ruined Norman castle, built in the 12th century to defend the Welsh border dominates the town.
Clungunford
Clungunford is a small village, witn no shops or pubs that is why it is a very peacefull place. The river clun runs through the village.
Clunton
Cockshutt
Cofton Hackett
Cold Brayfield
Cold Brayfield, in the ancient hundred of Bunsty, lies in flattish arable land in a loop of the Great Ouse.
Coleford
The market town of Coleford, known to have been in existence from 1275, has an attractive centre. The Clock Tower is all that remains of the original church built in 1821and demolished in 1882.
Collingtree
Coln Rogers
This idyllic Gloucestershire village takes its name from the fast flowing River Coln, which flows from the Cotswolds and eventually feeds into the mighty Thames.
Colston Bassett
Condover
Coppenhall
Corby
The modern industrial town of Corby is in north east Northamptonshire in the East Midlands.
Cosby
It is difficult to trace exactly where the name Cosby stems from, but it first appears in the Domesday Book when it was spelt by the scribes as Cossebi. Historian John Nicholls, writing in 1810, described it as a 'considerable village'.
Coseley
Cosgrove
Cossall
Cotterstock
Countesthorpe
The name Countesthorpe comes from the 11th century when the area formed part of the marriage dowry of the Countess Judith niece of William the Conqueror, 'thorpe' having the gothic meaning of 'land'.
Coventry
Coventry, dominated by its stunning state-of-the-art Cathedral, has wide pedestranised streets, modern architecture, good shopping facilities, fashionable restaurants, luxurious modern hotels, parks and gardens, theatres, and sports venues.
Cranfield
Cranford
Craven Arms
Craven Arms is named after its restored Georgian inn. A quiet little market town, which becomes busy during its annual sheep auctions held from August - October.
Credenhill
Cresswell
Creswell
Crich
Crick
Croft
Croft is a village of interest and character dominated by extensive quarry working which provide high quality granite. These workings are reputed to have been used for the Fosse Way.
Cromford
Cromford is Richard Arkwright's town. He was the great pioneer of the modern factory system, using water power to drive production machinery for the first time and revolutionising the textile industry.
Cromwell
Situated on the old Great North Road, 130 miles North of London between the Nottinghamshire market towns of Newark and Retford, the little village of Cromwell was known to the Romans who built a Villa here close to their two mighty highways
Cropredy
Cropston
Cropston is a picturesque village, close to the late 19th century reservoir, which takes its name from the village.
Cropwell Bishop
Crowden
The small hamlet of Crowden, also known as Crowden-in-Longdendale, is in the far northern tip of Derbyshire.
Crowell
Crowle
The parish of Crowle comprises three quite distinct settlements: Crowle itself, Crowle Green and a part of Sale Green hamlet. Geographically Crowle lies on the top of a hill known locally as Crowle Bank.
Croxton Kerrial
Crudgington
Curbar
Dale Abbey
Darley Abbey
Dawley
Denford
Denham
Denham Village survives as a peaceful and unspoiled area of historic buildings.
Derby
Derby is a busy industrial city, home of the famous Royal Crown Derby Porcelain. Derby lies on the west bank of the River Derwent close to its junction with the Trent.
Derrington
Derrington, Stafford is a picturesque village west of the County Town of Stafford. It boasts a Millenium Green which has a wild meadow, fruit and nut trees, herb garden, willow maze and walkways.
Didcot
Diddlebury
Didmarton
Ditton Priors
Dodford
Dorchester
If you're a fan of 'Midsomer Murders' you might be unaware that you are gazing at a few of ancient Dorchester's fine views in some of their episodes.
Down Ampney
Down Ampney is the birthplace of composer Ralph Vaughan Williams. In the bell tower of the old church, there is a modest exhibit about his life.
Draycott
Droitwich
Duddington
Dudley
The large town of Dudley in the West Midlands is 11 miles north west of Birmingham city centre and six miles south of Wolverhampton.
Duns Tew
What a marvellous name for an Oxfordshire village. People are genuinely intrigued with villages' name of Duns Tew.
Dunstable
Dunstable is the oldest charter town in Bedfordshire. Located on the beautiful Downs, in a gap within the Chilterns, it is proud of its rich history and heritage.
Eardisland
Eardisland is a beautiful Black and White village in north Herefordshire.
Eardisley
Earls Barton
East Langton
East Leake
East Retford
Eastwood
Crouched atop of a windy hill straddling the Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire border, Eastwood is a vibrant ex-mining town northwest of Nottingham.
Eaton
Eaton Bishop
Eccleshall
Eccleshall is also an old coaching centre - and it's easy to imagine yourself back in the days of horse-drawn travel in one of its original coaching inns.
Ecton
Edale
Edensor
Edgmond
Egginton
Eggington like many villages, developed round an estate and hall owned by the Every family. In 1902 the hall was visited by royalty, King George V11 and Queen Alexanda, over the next 50 years the hall slowly fell into decay.
Ellesmere
Set on the largest and most spectacular of nine glacial meres, Ellesmere was the birthplace of the Llangollen Canal, which was designed and built by Thomas Telford from his offices in the town and funded by money raised in a local hotel.
Elmesthorpe
The parish of Elmesthorpe has strong connections with King Richard III and the Battle of Bosworth.
Elmton
Elston
Elstow
Enderby
Enderby - The St. Johns area of the parish is separated from the main village, which is where the ancient village of Aldeby stood. Mentioned in the Domesday Book, this village was deserted probably in the 12th century.
Etruria
Ettington
Etwall
At first, Etwall seems like any other Derbyshire village. However, beneath the surface hides a village of great historical interest, dating back to the 16th century.
Evesbatch
Evesham
Evesham nestles at the foot of the Cotswold Hills, on the banks of the River Avon, at the heart of the fruit growing industry of the Vale of Evesham. An old market town, Evesham is still a lively shopping centre.
Ewelme
Ewyas Harold
Eyam
Farndish
Fawsley
Fenny Compton
Fenton
Finedon
Finedon is a Saxon Village with a great history. Finedon Hall, now converted into several homes is the grand building seen in the picture there are many historic buildings around the old end of the town...
Fingest
We have just received a description of Fingest from one of our readers. This description is currently being prepared for publication and will appear on this page within the next few days.
Flackwell Heath
Flackwell Heath is a bustling village on the edge of the Chiltern Hills. Once famed for its cherry orchards, its' success now is having good schools and great transport links with London and the Midlands.
Fladbury
Flitton
Flore
Ford Green
Forton
Fotheringhay
Foxton
Framilode
Frodesley
Frodesley is a tranquil hamlet on the edge of the Shropshire Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, commanding good views on all sides of the surrounding hills and farmland. The main street is a quiet cul-de-sac.
Furness Vale
Garsington
Garway
Gaydon
The village of Gaydon in Warwickshire is 10 miles south east of Leamington Spa and in 2001 it had a population of just 376 residents.
Gayhurst
Gayton
Glen Parva
Glen Parva - The Manor House is of interest, dating back to the 14th century and local records suggest that the ill-fated King Charles I stayed there after the Battle of Naseby.
Glenfield
Glenfield has a prominent place in railway history, with the opening of the Swannington Leicester line, the first railway line south of Manchester.
Glossop
Set within the Borough of High Peak in Derbyshire, Glossop is a market town midway between Sheffield and Manchester.
Gloucester
Overlooked by the Cotswold Hills, in the lush Severn valley, the city of Gloucester is perfectly located and easily accessible, from all corners of the country. Whatever you're length of stay, you'll find there's so much to see and do.
Gnosall
Gnosall (pronounced Knowsall) is a large Staffordshire village lying on the A518 between Stafford and Newport Shropshire. It has a thriving community with a primary school and a variety of services (doctors, vets, hairdressers) and shops.
Golden Valley
Golden Valley
Greasley
Greasley, was once the largest parish in Nottingham, nowadays you could drive through it and not even realise that you had been there!It now consists of a rural area of scattered farmsteads and houses.
Great Addington
Great Barford
Great Billing
Great Brickhill
Great Brington
Great Doddington
Great Glen
Great Glen is a historic village located in the beautiful South Leicestershire countryside. Perfect for a great day out, Great Glen offers visitors many things to visit/do, including: Wistow Maze and Rural centre, a large village Library
Great Linford
Great Longstone
Great Longstone is a small village in the Peak District National Park.It is a very old settlement and was mentioned in the Domesday book in 1086 as Langesdune.
Great Milton
Great Milton is a village just 7 miles east of Oxford surrounded by pretty South Oxfordshire countryside. There was an established community here as long ago as 1086.
Great Missenden
Great Missenden at the head of the Misbourne valley is an attractive small town, with a long curving High Street of half timbered and Georgian shops, a graciously proportioned Baptist Church and a number of traditional pubs.
Great Oxendon
Great Oxendon is a small village on the A508 just south of Market Harborough. It mainly dates from around 1800 and is built in red brick and local Northamptonshire sand stone.
Great Stretton
Great Tew
Great Tew is an ancient village five miles east of Chipping Norton in Oxfordshire.
Grendon
Grindleford
Hadnall
Hadnall is a small village about 4 miles North of Shrewsbury on the A49. Just south of the village is the site of the 140' battle of Shrewsbury where Henry IV defeated Harry Hotspur at the bloodiest of battles ever fought on English soil.
Halesowen
Halesowen is a town in the West Midlands, nine miles south west of Birmingham city centre and close to the M5 motorway.
Hallaton
Halloughton
Hambleden
Visit Hambleden, where Lord Cardigan (of Light Brigade fame) was born in the Manor House. You can see his sea chest, which accompanied him to the Crimea, preserved in the beautiful old church.
Hanley
Harbury
Harbury is an ancient, prehistoric village sitting on a hill near the Fosse Way Roman road in Warwickshire. The area has a large number of old quarries that were used to extract lyas limestone used in the manufacture of cement.
Hardwick
Hargrave
Harlescott
Harlestone
Harlington
The village of Harlington sits on the southern edge of the district, bordered by an area of natural beauty including the chalk downs of Sundon Hills Country Park and the vale of the River Flit.
Harringworth
Harrowden
Hartington
Hartpury
Hartwell
Harvington
Harworth
Hathersage
Haughton
Heage
Hedgerley
This small but picturesque old village was once a famous brick making centre in the 17th and 18th centuries.
Hednesford
Henley in Arden
Do you want to eat or have a drink at a 16th century coaching inn or in a 15th century timber framed building? Then, come to Henley-in-Arden!
Henley-on-Thames
Henley-on-Thames is the epitome of a perfect English town, located on the north side of the scenic River Thames. It is brimming with delightful homes, flower-filled gardens, quaint shops, waterfront pubs and places of historic interest.
Hereford
A city on the banks of the River Wye, Hereford is one of the largest cities in the county of Herefordshire. The city has a very fine heritage, with many historic buildings and modern shops.
Hethe
Hethe is aquiet little village, where there are buses out to Bicester and Brackley, then if you'd like to go further out to Oxford, or Banbury.
High Wycombe
Situated in the heart of the Chilterns, High Wycombe is the largest town in Buckinghamshire, having grown up during the 18th and 19th centuries around the furniture industry, and was once known as 'the furniture capital of England.'
Higham Ferrers
The town of Higham Ferrers is one of the gems of Northamptonshire. It contains a number of historic buildings and has a scenic market place. Its most famous son, Henry Chichele became Archbishop of Canterbury and adviser to Henry V
Highley
I have lived in Highley all of my life & I would not like to live anywhere else. Highley has a lot of countryside and the River Severn flows though it. Highley has a lot to offer: shops, churches, golf courses, hair dressers, takeaways etc.
Highpeak Junction
High Peak Junction is the start of the High Peak Trail, which follows the track of the former Cromford and High Peak Railway. Built in 1830, it was one of the earliest railways in the world and was designed on canal principles.
Himley
Hinstock
Hinton-in-the-Hedges
Hook Norton
What makes Hook Norton (Hooky to the locals) so special is the location, set in rolling countryside between the famous town of Banbury and Chipping Norton (home to the late comedian, Ronnie Barker).
Hope Bowdler
Hopesay
Horninglow
Once a farming village, urban expansion means Horninglow is now a suburb of Burton.
Horspath
Hughley
Hyssington
Ibstone
We have just received a description of Ibstone from one of our readers. This description is currently being prepared for publication and will appear on this page within the next few days.
Idbury
Ilam
Ilkeston
Ipstones
Irchester
Ironbridge
The village of Ironbridge on the River Severn, grew up around the famous Iron Bridge - the first of its kind in the world, and an icon of this area, which was the birthplace of the Industrial Revolution.
Irthlingborough
Isham
Islip
Iver Heath
Iver Heath is in south east Buckinghamshire and is part of the Iver parish. The word Iver means brow of the hill. It is approximately 20 miles west of London, close to the M25 and the M40, with the M4 about two miles to the south.
Ivinghoe
Kedleston
Kempley
Kenilworth
Kenilworth is a small town with an exceptionally good choice of restaurants and smaller shops. Enjoy excellent English, French, Chinese, Italian, Indian or even Thai cuisine. There are some good English pubs too!
Kettering
The market town of Kettering is in Northamptonshire, on the west bank of the River Ise between Corby and Northampton.
Kidderminster
Kidderminster situated about 20 miles from central Birmingham is a town which grew up (probably in Saxon times) around a crossing on the river Stour in Worcestershire.. Later the waters from the river attracted weavers of cloth and from t
Kidlington
Historic Kidlington, a 1930's 'Garden' community, is a picturesque, original 'greystone' village with modern day origins, just 4.5 miles from Oxford City.
Kilby
Kilby - A medieval village once surrounded the church at Kilby. The church itself was built on the site of an earlier structure in the year 1858.
Kilpeck
King's Cliffe
Kings Sutton
Kingsey
Kingsley
Kingsley is situated along the A52 Stoke to Asbourne road and is the southern most village in the Peak District and part of the Staffordshire Moorlands.
Kingswinford
Kingswood
Kinnerley
Kirby Muxloe
One of the country's most important monuments is in the parish of Kirby Muxloe. Built in the late 15th century by Lord Hastings, who was executed in 1483 before the building was completed, Kirby Muxloe Castle now has a Grade I listing.
Kirk Ireton
Kislingbury
Kniveton
Lane End
Laneham
Laneham Parish is a small, Trent side village which has a total population of approximately 300 people. It is sited 13 miles due west of the city of Lincoln and 8 miles East of the market town of Retford. Laneham is split into two villa
Langford
Latimer
Lavendon
Lavendon is perhaps not a typical Home Counties village, although it is in Buckinghamshire; reportedly the most northerly village in that county.
Leckhampton
Ledbury
The pretty market town of Ledbury is well-known for its distinctive black-and-white timber framed buildings. Located 14 miles east of Hereford, it is one of the most delightful English towns to visit.
Leicester
Leicester is one of the few cities in England that can trace its growth from the Iron Age. In Leicester you can travel through the ages, and learn about the history of the city in its excellent Museums, and by taking an Old Town Heritage Trail
Leighton Buzzard
Leighton Buzzard is a quintessential market town in the Chilterns near Milton Keynes and is infamous for the Great Train Robbery
Leintwardine
Leominster
Leominster is a small market town on the border between England and Wales. It has a number of attractive buildings in the High Street and a plethora of unusual and interesting shops.
Letcombe Bassett
Letcombe Bassett is a pretty little village, arranged around a steep-sided Oxfordshire valley that is the source of the Letcombe Brook.
Letcombe Regis
Letcombe Regis is a small Oxfordshire village, based along the sides of the Letcombe Brook which meanders through from Letcombe Bassett to Wantage just two miles away, and then on to join the Thames.
Lewknor
Lichfield
Located in southern Staffordshire, Lichfield has grown rapidly since the 1950s but retains a peaceful and stately charm due to its historic streets and buildings. The town's most famous son was Samuel Johnson (1709-1784)
Lidlington
The name 'Lidlington' derives from the Old English meaning 'the farm of Lytel's people'. A record of the village appears in the Domesday Book of 1087.
Lilleshall
Lillingstone Dayrell
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Linby
Linby is pretty and idyllic. Great effort has been expended in preserving its condition and character from the listed buildings and old fashioned sign post to the cast iron street lighting.
Lindridge
Little Marcle
Little Stretton
Little Stretton is in the heart of the Shropshire Hills, nestling at the foot of the Long Mynd and looking across the valley to Ragleth Hill.
Little Tew
Little Witcombe
The small hamlet of Little Witcombe is in Gloucestershire, just off the M5 and within striking distance of Gloucester.
Littleover
The oldest property in Littleover is the Thatched Cottage down in the Hollow, it may have been a labours cottage in the 16th century, Later it was an Inn now a private residence, lower down the Hollow is a ancient stone trough.
Llanyblodwel
Llanymynech
This small, pretty village straddles the border between England (Shropshire) and Wales (Powys). Once upon a dry time (in the days when you couldn't drink in Powys on Sundays) the lounge bar in the pub was shut on the Sabbath
Long Compton
Long Eaton
Long Wittenham
Long Wittenham, or Wittas Ham is a small village near the Thames in south Oxfordshire, apparently named after a Saxon known as Witta, who settled in the area in the 6th century.
Longnor
Loughborough
Loughborough, with its unique atmosphere and wealth of historic buildings, is the principal town of the Borough of Charnwood, which is one of the largest Boroughs within Leicestershire.
Lower Brailes
Lower Heyford
Lower Oddington
Lower Shuckburgh
Lower Shuckburgh is a small historical village set in East Warwickshire near the Northamptonshire border.
Lower Slaughter
Lowick
Ludlow
Medieval Ludlow - Capital of the Marches - Ludlow is often called the 'perfect historic Town'. The castle is perched high on a cliff above the picturesque River Teme and breathes history at every turn.
Luston
Luston is a small hamlet,it doesn't have a church. The church is 1 mile away along Eye Lane.The school was at Moreton (about 1.5 miles away).
Luton
Luton is a large town in Bedfordshire with a population of around 240,000. It is 30 miles north of London and is best known for its airport.
Lutterworth
Lutterworth is an attractive town with some well preserved half-timbered buildings and an 18th century bridge, which spans the River Swift in a series of three arches.
Lydham
Lydney
There has been a settlement at Lydney ever since Roman times. It is thought that Lydney Park was a significant Roman settlement with a temple, bath house and guest house dating back to the 4th century.
Lye
Lye is a leafy suburb between Stourbridge and Halesowen. It is less than two miles from open country, and the landscape is hilly. Lye itself consists chiefly of a main high street, containing all manner of shops.
Lyonshall
Lyonshall is a large parish in north-west Herefordshire, close to the Welsh border town of Kington. It has a population of some 750 people in around 280 dwellings.
Maer
Maer is a rural village located on the borders of Staffordshire, Cheshire and Shropshire, to the west of the pottery manufacturing town of Stoke-on-Trent.
Maesbury Marsh
The original plan by the Ellesmere Canal Company (later The Shropshire Union Railways and Canal Company) was to build a canal from the Mersey across the Wirral to Chester then up to Wrexham and thence south
Maidford
Maidford is a small, compact village on the slopes of a shallow upland valley on the former main road between Northampton and Banbury and is designated as a conservation village.
Maids Moreton
Maids Moreton, lovely Buckinghamshire Village. There are no shops now, just The Old Post Office, (a private residence) and the pubs, 'The Wheatsheaf' in the village itself, and 'The Buckingham Arms' at Duck Lake.
Maidwell
Maidwell is a small village situated on the edge of the Northamptonshire Leicestershire borders, approximately 4 miles from the market town of Market Harborough and 10 miles from Northampton.
Maisemore
Malvern
The name Malvern is derived from the ancient British language spoken by the people who lived in the area about 2000 years ago, before the Roman invasion. The words 'Moelbyrn' of 'Moel Vern' mean 'bare hill'.
Malvern Wells
Mansfield
Mansfield is a large town in Nottinghamshire, second in size only to the city of Nottingham.
Mapledurham
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Market Bosworth
Market Bosworth, was recorded in the Domesday Book and has been an important market town since the middle ages. The famous Battle of Bosworth, which ended the Wars of the Roses in 1485, took place nearby.
Market Drayton
Market Drayton is Famous for being the birthplace of Robert Clive - Clive of India; visitors can take a town trail and discover his 'Boyhood Haunts'.
Market Harborough
Market Harborough is a rare example of a planned medieval 'new town'. Market Harborough was created in the 12th century especially to be a market and promote local trade.
Marlow
Marlow is a pleasant Georgian town, situated on a beautiful stretch of the River Thames, midway between Reading and Windsor. Marlow is surrounded by the lovely countryside of the Chiltern Hills which are designated an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.
Marsh Baldon
Marston Moretaine
The village of Marston Moretaine, also spelt Marston Moreteyne, with its 3,700 residents is in a scenic part of Bedfordshire, between the major conurbations of Milton Keynes and Bedford.
Matlock
Matlock is on the River Derwent, at the eastern edge of the Derbyshire Peak District and at the southern end of the Peak National Park. The coming of the railways transformed Matlock from a small hamlet whose main occupations were farming
Matlock Bank
Matlock Bank is the name given to the steep hillside to the east of the River Derwent, where Bank Road rises steeply from Crown Square in the centre of Matlock. This was once the site of the steepest tramway in the world.
Matlock Bath
Matlock Bath enjoys a dramatic location in the deep gorge of the River Derwent. It has been a tourist resort since 1689 when warm springs, at a constant temperature of 68 degrees F, were discovered. Few people take the waterers today
Maulden
Medmenham
Meerbrook
Melton Mowbray
The Market town of Melton Mowbray in Leicestershire, perhaps most famous for its Pork Pies, is situated in Fox Hunting country, where the three hunts The Quorn, The Belvoir and the Cottesmore meet.
Melverley
The village of Melverley is off the beaten track, a quiet village with houses and farms scattered over a large area.
Meriden
The village of Meriden is situated between Coventry and Solihull in the West Midlands.
Mickleover
You could be forgiven for thinking that Mickleover is just another overspill residential area of Derby with it's row of busy shops and business serving the ever expanding housing developments but Mickleover hides a secret.
Mickleton
Middle Aston
Middle Tysoe
Middleton on the Hill
Millbrook
Millers Dale
Milton Keynes
In Milton Keynes, you'll never be short of something to do. The city offers some of the most exciting activities and some of the best entertainment experiences anywhere in the UK, Milton Keynes is a truly exceptional destination to visit.
Misterton
Moggerhanger
A hill top village dominated by the Church of St. John The Evangelist, which was built in 1860-61, of French influence. The Church has a chancel tower with a pyramid roof and high apse adjoining.
Monyash
Morcott
Moreton-in-Marsh
Moreton-in-Marsh, the lovely old market town in the north Cotswolds, grew up around the Fosse Way, the old Roman road which runs through the wide main street.
Mountsorrel
Mountsorrel is situated on the old A6 route, seven miles north of Leicester and four miles from Loughborough.
Much Wenlock
Stay in Much Wenlock and you will discover the rustic charm of a medieval market town complete with historic buildings and speciality shops.
Mugginton
Netherton
Newark-on-Trent
Newark-on-Trent is a historic market town about 16 miles north east of Nottingham in the East Midlands and 15 miles from the historic city of Lincoln.
Newbold on Avon
Newborough
Newcastle-under-Lyme
The town of Newcastle-under-Lyme is part of the Potteries in Staffordshire.
Newent
Newent is the smallest of the four towns in the Forest of Dean District and lies in the North West corner of the county of Gloucestershire, known for many years as the capital of the Ryelands.
Newland
Newport (Telford)
One of the most unspoiled market towns in the district, Newport has a fascinating history as a twelfth century planned town, which was largely rebuilt in the 17th century after a great fire in 1665.
Newport Pagnell
Newport Pagnell is an established market town in Buckinghamshire, four miles north of Milton Keynes and close to the M1 motorway.
Newtown Linford
Newtown Linford is set against a backdrop of the Charnwood woodlands, making it a very photogenic village with its thatched dwellings and timbered style buildings.
Norbury
Normanton upon Soar
Normanton on Soar is a small, pretty, well kept 12th century village which sits on the border of Nottinghamshire and Leicestershire.
North Leverton
North Leverton with Habblesthorpe is a small village in North Nottinghamshire with a Big name. In fact North Leverton with Habblesthorpe is the longest place name in the country.
North Marston
North Marston is A village in Buckinghamshire 3 Miles south of Winslow and 4 miles North of Waddesdon. Marston literally means farm-by-marsh - referring to the clay soils of the village that hold water whenever it rains.
North Wingfield
Northampton
Northampton is a large market town of around 200,000 people, about 50 miles southeast of Birmingham. It was initially a farming community around the 7th century and later became the centre of the ancient kingdom of Mercia.
Northill
The parish of Northill encompasses Ickwell, Lower and Upper Caldecote also Hatch and Thorncote, all in the heart of market garden country, Northill was originally known as North Givell meaning the northern part of territory of the River Ivel.
Norton Canes
Norton juxta Twycross
Norton juxta Twycross today is a quiet and peaceful little village in Leicestershire, close to the Warwickshire border and is bounded on the east side by the Ashby Canal.
Nottingham
Welcome to Nottingham, a vibrant friendly city - where the past and present harmonise perfectly to create a unique destination, offering something for everyone.
Nuneaton
Nuneaton is the largest town in Warwickshire. It is best known for its connections with Victorian novelist Mary Anne Evans, who wrote under the pen name of George Eliot.
Oakamoor
Oakamoor is a very picturesque small village a few miles from the Peak District. The River Churnet runs through the village and summer days can be passed, just having a picnic on its banks.
Oakengates
Oakengates is now part of Telford - Once a small, self-contained industrial town with a long history of coal mining and iron foundries. The town is now generating a reputation for itself as a centre for evening entertainment.
Oakham
Ocle Pychard
The rural Parish of Ocle Pychard in the Deanery of Bromyard, in Hereford diocese, is situated on the main road between Hereford and Bromyard and is about 7 miles equidistant from both.
Old Warden
Old Warden's history can be traced back to Roman times. A Cistercian Abbey was situated near the Cardington Road and a small part still stands, identified by its Elizabethan chimney.
Oldbury
Oldbury is at the centre of Sandwell, both geographically and as the site of the borough's Council House. The town dates from the 13th century, and for most of its history it was part of the parish of Halesowen in Worcestershire.
Oldbury on the Hill
Ollerton
Olney
Olney is a traditional market town on the Bedfordshire Buckinghamshire borders, just a short drive from Milton Keynes.
Orlingbury
Oswestry
Unspoiled by progress, Oswestry is a bustling market town with an individual character formed over centuries. Narrow passageways link streets whose names conjure up images of the past: English Walls, Welsh Walls, The Bailey and The Horsemarket.
Oundle
The market town of Oundle sits on the banks of the River Nene in Northamptonshire, about 12 miles southwest of Peterborough.
Overbury
Oxford
Oxford, (the city of dreaming spires) is renowned the world over, as the home of one of the oldest and most highly revered Universities in Europe.
Pailton
Painswick
Parwich
Parwich is an attractive, historic village. Its stone cottages - many dating back over 200 years - are packed into the valley bottom and spread up the lower slopes of the surrounding hills.
Paulerspury
Peak Forest
Pelsall
Pembridge
Few places in Herefordshire are lovelier than Pembridge. This small village is located on the sloping sides of the valley above the River Arrow, seven miles west of Leominster.
Penkridge
Penn
Penn is extensively wooded and criss-crossed by lanes and footpaths.
Pershore
The delightful market town of Pershore is located on the banks of the River Avon and is famous for its Georgian architecture in Bridge Street and Broad Street.
Pertenhall
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Peterchurch
Piddington
Piddington
Pilton
Pleasley
Pontesbury
Potton
Potton is an ancient market town centred around a very attractive Market square adorned by redbrick 18th century buildings. Dominating the square is the neo-Georgian Clock House, built in 1956 it now houses the library.
Prestwood
Once the home of the late Prime Minister Atlee, Prestwood has grown tremendously in the last twenty years. Just a mile up the hill from Roald Dahl's home town of Great Missenden, Prestwood has much to offer.
Princes Risborough
Princes Risborough lies in the lee of the Chiltern Hills, mid-way between Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire's County Town, and High Wycombe, the County's largest town. It is approximately 35 miles north west of London and 25 south east of Oxford.
Priors Marston
Puttenham
The beautiful County of Hertfordshire extends a peninsula westwards into Buckinghamshire, a borough that was given the name of Dacorum under the 1974 Local Government changes.
Pytchley
Quatford
Queniborough
Queniborough is a pleasing conservation village with visible links back to the Civil War period. A 175 feet high crocketed spire, acknowledged by Pevsner to be one of the finest in Leicestershire, caps St. Mary's Church.
Quorn
Quorn is known world-wide for its link with Hugo Meynell, a dominant figure in English foxhunting who lived at Quorn Hall from 1753-1800.
Ratcliffe
Ratcliffe is sited between the banks of the River Wreake and the main A46 highway. Home to Ratcliffe College, started by Pugin in 1844 as the first Roman Catholic College in England since the Reformation.
Ratley
Ratlinghope
The small village of Ratlinghope and its equally tiny offshoot Bridges lie in the beautiful valley of the Darnford brook, which rises at Wildmoor Pool on the Long Mynd. Its name is pronounced "Ratchup" by some locals.
Raunds
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Redditch
The town of Redditch is in north east Worcestershire about 15 miles south of Birmingham.
Rednal
Repton
Ringstead
Ripple
Roade
Rockingham
Ross-on-wye
Herefordshire is known for its pretty villages and Ross-on-Wye surely tops the list. This small market town has just over 10,000 residents and the picturesque streets, shops and quaint market square draw many more thousands of tourists.
Rothersthorpe
Rothley
Rothley is another stop on the Great Central Railway, a quiet village on the eastern edge of the Charnwood Forest, originally built around Rothley Brook, a tributary of the Soar.
Rowley Regis
The secret of Rowley Regis' success is its firm foundations. The Romans first came to the area 2,000 years ago, attracted by the hard rock of the Rowley Hills; the legacy of quarrying is still part of the local landscape.
Rowlstone
Roxton
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Royal Leamington Spa
Just three miles from Warwick, Royal Leamington Spa is a fashionable town with its Georgian and Victorian architecture, tree lined avenues and squares and glorious gardens.
Rugby
Rugby is a pretty market town in Warwickshire with a population of around 62,000 people. It is on the eastern edge of the county, about 13 miles east of Coventry.
Rushbury
The village of Rushbury lies in Apedale below the ridge of Wenlock Edge. It has a 19th century school, a half-timbered manor house, the earthworks of a Norman castle and an ancient church.
Rushden
Rushden, called Risedene in the Doomsday Book, apparently takes its name from the stream or brook that can be seen in Rushden Hall Park before it disappears under the modern Duck Street.
Rushton
Rushton Spencer
Rushton Spencer is a rural area between the market town of Leek and Macclesfield. Rushton is home to the delightful timber framed church of St Lawrence.
Sandhurst
Sandy
For centuries Sandy was the centre for market gardening and it still remains vital to the town today. Excavations indicate that Sandy was once a Roman settlement.
Sapcote
The name Sapcote could have an agricultural connection with Sheepcote or with Soapwell, a well in Station Road where in 1806 a bath house was built by John Frewen Turner.
Saundby
Saxby
The Great County of Leicestershire lies at the very heart of the nation with history woven into the very fabric of its landscape.
Scarrington
Seagrave
Seagrave is situated just minutes from the busy A46; it is a secluded and picturesque village, with red roofed houses and distinctive church.
Selattyn
Shackerstone
Shareshill
Shefford
Shepshed
Shepshed stands to the west of the M1 motorway and was formerly dominated by the hosiery industry. It still offers factory outlet shopping for knitwear and sports clothing.
Shifnal
Shipston on Stour
Shipston-on-Stour is a small town and civil parish within the Stratford-on-Avon district of the southern part of Warwickshire, England. It is close to the borders with Oxfordshire and Gloucestershire.
Shireoaks
Shirland
Shobdon
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Shottery
Shrewsbury
Shrewsbury is one of the country's most famous and picturesque market towns. In an idyllic border location, it is cradled by the rolling hills and plains of Shropshire. Famous for being the birthplace of Charles Darwin.
Shugborough
Shugborough, The Complete Working Historic Estate. Journey through the historic estate of Shugborough and discover a bygone era as our costumed living history characters bringing the past to life.
Sileby
Sileby is situated on the eastern side of the Soar Valley, it is a mix of residential and light industry.
Silsoe
Silverstone
Silverstone is a highly desirable village in Northamptonshire, best known as the location of the Silverstone Racing Circuit and home of the British Grand Prix.
Skenfrith
Slapton
Buried deep in the heart of England, the Northamptonshire village of Slapton is a small settlement with much to offer a wide range of visitors and residents alike.
Smethwick
Smethwick - From a rural community of farms and cottages, through the transformation of the Industrial Revolution to the bustling community of today - in many ways Smethwick is Sandwell in microcosm.
Solihull
Solihull is a vibrant, stylish and friendly place to live, work and visit. It has many shops, pubs, resturants, bars and parks for everyone to enjoy.
South Cerney
Southrop
Southwell
Southwell is one of Nottinghamshire’s prettiest towns with the lovely Southwell Minister, prebendal cathedral houses and historic Saracens Head pub gracing the town centre.
Spetchley
Sproxton
Stafford
You can experience England's heritage at its richest in Stafford and the surrounding area. This ancient borough reveals history at its most colourful.
Standish
Stanion
Stanton in Peak
Stanwick
Staple Hill
Staple Hill is a suburb of Bristol which comes under the administrative control of the South Gloucestershire Local Authority. The strange name 'Staple Hill' may derive from the old English word 'steap' meaning 'steep'
Stathern
Steppingley
Steppingley is a rural village in Bedfordshire, England. It stands on high ground in the centre of a small parish of about 562 hectares on the Greensand Ridge, and is mentioned in the Doomsday Book.
Stockton on Teme
Stoke Doyle
Stoke Hammond
The village of Stoke Hammond is to be found in the north eastern quadrant of the great County of Buckinghamshire.
Stoke Lacy
Stoke Poges
Stoke Poges is famous for its association with Thomas Gray. The poet lies in the simple tomb of his mother and sister in the churchyard of the Church of St Giles.
Stoke-on-Trent
Stoke-on-Trent is a conurbation of six small towns - Tunstall, Burslem, Hanley, Stoke, Fenton and Longton - which make up The Potteries Staffordshire.
Stondon
Stone
The attractive town of Stone received its market charter in 1251, and built its fortunes on shoemaking, brewing coaching and canals.
Stone
Stoney Stanton
Stoney Stanton has a long history of stone quarrying going back to the Romans. After the Second World War the quarrying business came to an end, but not before thousands of tons of rock had been extracted, leaving deep water filled areas.
Stony Stratford
The small market town of Stony Stratford is in north Buckinghamshire on the banks of the Great River Ouse.
Stopsley
Stourbridge
The historic glass-producing town of Stourbridge is in the West Midlands, 13 miles west of Birmingham between Dudley and Kidderminster.
Stourport-on-Severn
Stourport-on-Severn is, uniquely, the only town in Britain to be built solely as a consequence of the coming of the canals. Before the growth of the town there existed a small hamlet called Lower Mitton.
Stow-on-the-Wold
Stow-on-the-Wold is the highest of the Cotswold towns, situated at the meeting place of eight roads. Stow was the most important market town in the north Cotswolds when the sale of the sheep and wool was at its height.
Stratford-Upon-Avon
Beautifully situated on the River Avon, Stratford-Upon-Avon has a number of attractions linked to the famous Bard. Explore this historic market town and its surroundings and discover where Shakespeare was born and grew up.
Strensham
Stretton under Fosse
Stretton-on-Fosse
Stretton-on-Fosse is a small quiet village, which has fewer than 200 houses, most built of Cotswold stone and locally-made red brick.
Stroud
The Gloucestershire market town of Stroud is ten miles south of Gloucester and is a popular destination for tourists visiting the scenic Cotswolds.
Studham
Sudborough
Sugnall
Sugnall is a hamlet of Saxon origin in the parish of Eccleshall, and is almost all within the Sugnall Estate. Topographically it is part of the attractive headwaters of the River Sow
Sutton
An historic and picturesque village situated a few miles from Potton. A tributary of the River Ivel crosses the road where Sutton's medieval twin arched packhorse bridge spans the ford.
Sutton Coldfield
Sutton Coldfield in the West Midlands is about eight miles northeast of Birmingham City Centre.
Swadlincote
Swadlincote is the southern most town in Derbyshire, the main street is a busy traffic free shopping precinct, furnished with ample seating, shaded under trees. The focal point of the town is the market square.
Swineshead
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Swithland
Swithland is a pleasant Forest village close to both the Woods and Reservoir, which also bear its name. The village is known well beyond Charnwood for its dark blue slate, which produced roofing material from the times of the Romans to the 19th century.
Swyncombe
Swynnerton
Syde
Syston
In Victorian times Syston was a busy cattle dealing town. There is still evidence of the late 18th century development in its conservation area around the parish church of St. Peter.
Sywell
Tamworth
The Staffordshire town of Tamworth has a beautiful historic town centre. It is situated on the River Tame, 14 miles northeast of Birmingham.
Tansley
Tansley is in Derbyshire, 1.5 miles east of Matlock, in the south-east of the Peak District, just outside the Peak District National Park in the centre of England. The village has one shop (for sale), a primary school, an Anglican church,a
Tansor
Tanworth
Taplow
Taplow is a small, quiet village separated from Berkshire by the River Thames.
Tatenhill
Tatenhill and surrounding countryside includes Rangemore and Callingwood in the National Forest. Tatenhill church of St Michaels and All Angels contains a fine alabaster monument to Sir Hugh Griffiths with his wife.
Taxal
Telford
Telford is named in honour of renowned eighteenth century road builder and engineer Thomas Telford, Shropshire's first county surveyor.
Tenbury Wells
Tenbury lies in the northern part of the Malvern Hills District and borders Shropshire to the north and Herefordshire to the south and west. It is on the south side of the Teme Valley and is built on the valley's flood plain.
Teversal
Tewkesbury
Tewkesbury is a medieval gem famed for its timber framed buildings. An ancient settlement situated at the meeting of the rivers Avon and Severn, a delight for those seeking 'Olde England'
Thornborough
Thornbury
Thorpe Satchville
Thorpe Waterville
Thorpe Waterville in Northamptonshire is a quiet little village, with a nice country pub, which has been very updated.
Thrapston
Thrapston is a delightful small town in Northamptonshire Near the River Nene, with a population of just over 5,000 residents. It is just off the A14 between Kettering and Huntingdon.
Thrussington
Thrussington has some interesting 18th century properties surrounding the village green. It is the birthplace in 1782, of artist, John Ferneley, who depicted much of Leicestershire's 19th century hunting scene.
Thurcaston
Thurcaston claims to be the birthplace of the martyred Tudor Bishop, Hugh Latimer. As a youth, he may well have been familiar with All Saints Church, parts of which date back to Norman times.
Thurleigh
Tibshelf
Tideswell
Tipton
Little is known of Tipton's earliest history, the area was once part of the Royal Forest of Cannock, and records survive of land ownership in Norman times. By the 12th century there was a church (St. John's) and a moated manor house.
Tissington
Tithby
Toddington
The idyllic Cotswolds village of Toddington in Gloucestershire it is 12 miles north east of Cheltenham.
Tong
Toot Baldon
Tortworth
Towcester
Tugby
Turville
Visitors to the tiny village of Turville, in Buckinghamshire may find themselves with a weird sense that they have been there before. In fact this village is better known as Dibley from the BBC TV series the Vicar of Dibley
Tutbury
Tutbury - The Historic village on the banks of the River Dove, is dominated by the remains of the imposing Tutbury Castle, where Mary Queen of Scots was imprisoned three times.
Tuxford
Twywell
Ullesthorpe
Ullingswick
Upper Arley
Upper Boddington
'The Boddingtons' - we are one village comprising of Upper and Lower Boddington. Together we are very quiet and very rural.
Upper Langwith
Upper Langwith or Langwith Bassett as it is also known is a rural area of dispersed farmsteads & individual houses that encompass an extremely pretty village with a village green which the landscaped River Poulter runs through.
Upper Slaughter
The village of Upper Slaughter lies two miles beyond the better-known Lower Slaughter, just off the A429 trunk road between Bourton-on-the-Water and Stow-on-the Wold. This area is, without any doubt, one of the most beautiful in England
Uppingham
Upton Magna
Upton upon Severn
The historic town of Upton upon Severn is a thriving town, a perfect specimen of a Severn River port and a place of beauty. Here you will find a mix of half timbered and Georgian buildings, whilst the bridge connects the town with the modern marina.
Uttoxeter
Uttoxeter is a friendly market town in Staffordshire, close to the Peak District and the scenic River Dove.
Wadenhoe
Walgrave
Wallingford
In 1066 William the Conqueror came to Wallingford and ordered the building of the castle which must have been impressive; it was to dominate the town for the next 600 years.
Walsall
Walsall is an important industrial town in the West Midlands, about 13 miles northwest of Birmingham city centre and close to the M6.
Walsgrave on Sowe
Walton-on-the-Wolds
Walton-on-the-Wolds was the home in the 19th century of Augustus Hobart-Hampden, better known as Hobart Pasha, who had an adventurous naval career.
Wantage
The market town of Wantage is probably most famous for its illustrious resident King Alfred the Great and there is a wonderful statue of him dominating the quaint market square.
Warmington
Warton
Warwick
Warwick is probably best known for its magnificent castle - one of England's top attractions set in gardens landscaped by Capability Brown. The historic town itself is well worth exploring.
Watchfield
Wednesbury
Wednesbury is one of the oldest parts of Sandwell. The 'bury' part of the name indicates there may have been an Iron Age fort or 'beorg' on Church Hill as long ago as 200BC.
Weeford
Weldon
Wellingborough
Wellington (Telford)
Now part of Telford, Wellington still retains its character as an historic market town, set against the backdrop of the Wrekin Hill.
Wem
The small market town of Wem, is famous for being the birthplace of the modern Sweet Pea. Visitors come from far and wide, to attend the annual show held in July.
Wendover
Wendover is a picturesque town, one of its jewels being the Red Lion, whose former guests include Oliver Cromwell and Robert Louis Stevenson. The focal point of the town is the Clock tower, built in 1842.
Weobley
You would be hard pressed to find a more rural, picturesque village than Weobley. It really is hidden away. It is not on a main road. It has beautiful, half- timbered buildings.
West Bromwich
West Bromwich is the borough's largest town and is mentioned in the Doomsday Book of 1086. At the time Bromwich - 'the little village on the heath of broom' - was among the possessions of William Fitz-Ansculf, Baron of Dudley.
West Hagbourne
West Hallam
West Wycombe
Picturesque West Wycombe has belonged to the National Trust since 1934. Most of the buildings lining its one main street date from the 17th and 18th centuries and the Church is a very well-known landmark, with its golden ball dominating the village.
Westbury-on-Severn
Westbury-on-Severn is an attractive rural village situated, as its name suggests, on the River Severn. It is noted for its most unusual parish church which has a separate steeple.
Westhide
Weston Subedge
Weston Turville
Weston-on-Avon
Weston-under-Lizard
Weston-under-Lizard is a small but charming village in a scenic rural part of Staffordshire, close to the border with Shropshire.
Wetton
Whatstandwell
Whetstone
Whetstone - The 1086 Domesday Survey records Whetstone as having 24 peasants, 11 villeins, one man at arms and a windmill.
Whiston
Whitchurch
Whitchurch is a bustling market town and an ideal base for a holiday whatever your interests. It is the home of J. B. Joyce, the oldest tower clockmakers in the world.
Whittlebury
Wilbarston
We have just received a description of Wilbarston from one of our readers. This description is currently being prepared for publication and will appear on this page within the next few days.
Wilby
Willen
Willington
Willstone
Willstone is a tiny hamlet in the parish of Cardington. It lies on the South-East slope of a ridge called The Wilderness, overlooked by higher hills - Caer Caradoc and The Lawley. South of Willstone rises Willstone Hill, with the rock tow
Winforton
Winslow
Winslow is a small town of immense charm and character. The most prominent building is Winslow Hall, designed by Sir Christopher Wren in the early 18th century.
Wirksworth
Witney
Woburn
Woburn is surrounded by wooded countryside and parkland with the Greensand Ridge running through the north western part of the parish. The town takes its name from its Saxon settlers - Wo meaning twisted or crooked - Burn meaning a stream.
Wolfhamcote
Wollaston
Wolverhampton
The city of Wolverhampton is in the West Midlands, 18 miles northeast of Birmingham and close to the M6 and M54. It is on the main railway line to London.
Wolverton
The small town of Wolverton is on the outskirts of Milton Keynes, between Stony Stratford and Newport Pagnall.
Woodborough
Woodford
Woodhouse Eaves
Woodhouse Eaves is at the heart of the Charnwood Forest. Close to Beacon Hill (818 feet high), where once existed an Iron Age settlement.
Woodstock
Woodstock is a lovely Georgian town which is only 8 miles from Oxford, and known as the nearest town to Blenheim Palace
Woolhope
Woore
Wootton
Worcester
The historic Cathedral City of Worcester stands on the banks of the River Severn. It can be said that the English civil War began and ended at Worcester, earning the City its motto - 'The Faithful City', for its support of the Stuarts.
Wordsley
Wordsley is situated between Stourbridge and Kingswinford in the heart of The Black Country, West Midlands. It is a village community with a host of shops and eateries and more fine ale houses than you can shake a stick at.
Worksop
The town of Worksop in Nottinghamshire is on the edge of Sherwood Forest, 31 miles east of Sheffield.
Wormleighton
Wotton Underwood
Wrestlingworth
Wymeswold
Wymeswold lies a few miles to the north east of Loughborough. It is now a large and popular conservation village, with some fine Georgian buildings, over 30 of the houses are now Grade 2 listed buildings.
Yelden
Youlgreave
The village of Youlgreave (pronounced Youlgrave) is a popular starting point for walks in the White Peak. It lies on a narrow limestone shelf, with houses spilling down the steep slope to the river Bradford.

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