Historic Houses in Heart of England.

Anne Hathaway's Cottage
The most romantic of all the Shakespearean properties, is Anne Hathaway's Cottage, which lies in the beautiful hamlet of Shottery, just outside Stratford-upon-Avon.
Blenheim Palace
Blenheim Palace was built for the National Hero John 1st Duke of Marlborough and his Duchess Sarah, given by Queen Anne as a gift in reward for his military services.
Chatsworth
Chatsworth is the home of the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire, and has been the family home of the Cavendish family since 1549.There's always something different to see, do and discover at Chatsworth.
Shakespeare's Birthplace
The Man of the Millennium - William Shakespeare, was born in 1564 in the half-timbered house in Henley Street, Stratford-upon-Avon. You can still visit this house today.
Arbury Hall
Arbury Hall has been the seat of the Newdegate family for over 400 years and is the ancestral home of Vicount and Viscountess Daventry.
Attingham Park
Attingham Park was built in 1785 for the 1st Lord Berwick. It has a picture gallery by John Nash, magnificent Regency interiors and collections of silver, Italian furniture and Grand Tour paintings.
Baddesley Clinton Hall
Enjoy a day at Baddesley Clinton, the medieval moated manor house with hidden secrets! One the most enchanting properties owned by the National Trust, Baddesley Clinton has seen little change since 1633 when Henry Ferrers 'the Antiquary' died.
Bantock House Museum

Well-hidden within Bantock Park, Bantock House has now been restored to it's full Edwardian Glory. Explore the delightful home of the Bantock Family, and on the way, you'll discover some of Wolverhampton's secret history.

Belton House
Belton House is one of England's finest historic stately homes from the Restoration period It is built in the style of an old French mansion and is reached through the Lion Gates.
Blakesley Hall
Blakesley Hall has been carefully refurbished and restored. It was re-opened to the public on 4th May 2002. The Hall is a timber-framed farmhouse built, in 1590, by Richard Smalbroke a man of local importance.
Boscobel House
Boscobel House was built in about 1632, when John Giffard of Whiteladies converted a timber-framed farmhouse into a hunting lodge.
Boughton House
Boughton House is the Northamptonshire home of the Duke and Duchess of Buccleuch and Queensberry.
Brockhampton Estate
At the heart of the Brockhampton estate lies Lower Brockhampton - a medieval moated manor house with a beautiful timber framed gatehouse.
Broughton Castle
The home of Lord and Lady Saye and Sele, and owned by the same family for over 600 years.
Calke Abbey
A tour of Calke Abbey's treasures is like taking a step back in history. The stately home remains in a mid-19th century time warp.
Canons Ashby House
Canons Ashby has been the family home of the Drydens since Elizabethan times and that family atmosphere remains today.
Charlecote Park
A visit to Charlecote Park is a chance to follow the fortunes of the Lucy family who came to England during the time of William the Conqueror.
Chastleton House
Chastleton House is one of England's finest and most complete Jacobean houses. It is filled with a mixture of rare and everyday objects, furniture and textiles collected since its completion in 1612.
Chavenage
This historic Elizabethan house, home of the Lowsley-Williams family, contains much of interest to the discerning visitor. Visitors can see the tapestry rooms and furniture and relics of the Cromwellian period.
Claydon House
Claydon is an extraordinary house with remarkable 18th century, rococo and chinoiserie decoration. Features include the unique Chinese room and parquetry Grand Stairs.
Coughton Court
Coughton Court has been the ancestral home of the Throckmorton family since 1409 and is a fine example of a Tudor stately home.
Croome Park
Fans of Lancelot "Capability" Brown will want to visit Croome Park as this was the first major landscape which he designed.
Donington le Heath Manor House
Step back in time and experience how people really lived in Medieval, Tudor and Stuart Times at Donington le Heath Manor House.
Dudmaston Estate
Dudmaston offers a wonderful collection of art and sculptures in a grand country house setting. A visit to this splendid estate offers choices of how to spend your day.
Eastnor Castle
In the dramatic setting of the Malvern Hills and surrounded by a beautiful deer park, arboretum and lake, this fairy-tale castle is the home of the Hervey-Bathurst family.
Farnborough Hall
Farnborough Hall was acquired by the Holbech family in 1684, and the honey-coloured, Grade I listed, two-storey mansion was built shortly after that.
Ford Green Hall
Ford Green Hall is a seventeenth century house complete with period garden. It was home to the Ford family for almost two centuries.
Haddon Hall
Haddon Hall - the Derbyshire Home of the Duke of Rutland, has belonged to the family since the late 16th century.
Hagley Hall
Hagley Hall and Park are among the supreme achievements of eighteenth-century English architecture and landscape gardening.
Hall's Croft
Halls Croft was the home of Dr. John Hall and Shakespeare's eldest daughter Susanna, whom he married in 1607.
Hanbury Hall
When Thomas Vernon commissioned Hanbury Hall to be built near Droitwich Spa, he employed only the best designers and artisans to create this lovely William and Mary-style mansion and gardens.
Harvard House
Harvard House is not currently open to the public.Harvard House was the home of Katherine Rogers, mother of John Harvard, whose bequest made possible the foundation of Harvard University. Harvard House is the home of the Museum of British Pewter.
Harvington Hall
The moated island was made about 1260 and parts of the Hall are medieval, but most of it was built by Humphrey Pakington about 1580.
Holdenby House and Gardens
Just across the fields from Althorp lies Holdenby, a house whose royal connections go back over 400 years. Built by Sir Christopher Hatton to entertain Elizabeth I, it became the Palace of James I and the prison of his son, Charles I.
Kedleston Hall
Fans of 18th century architect, Robert Adam, are in for a treat at Kedleston Hall. The interior designs of this Palladian mansion have some of the best examples of Adam's work.
Kelmarsh Hall and Gardens
Kelmarsh is a 3,363 acre (1361ha) agricultural estate at the heart of which stands the eighteenth century Kelmarsh Hall, surrounded by its pleasure gardens and parkland.
Kelmscott Manor
Kelmscott Manor, a grade 1 listed Tudor farmhouse adjacent to the River Thames, was the summer home of William Morris from 1871 until his death in 1896. Morris loved the house as a work of true craftsmanship, totally unspoilt and unaltered.
Lamport Hall
Lamport Hall was the home of the Isham family for over four centuries.
Little Malvern Court
Little Malvern Court has been the home of the Berington family by descent since the Dissolution of the Monasteries in 1539.
Lodge Park and Sherborne Estate
Gloucestershire is well known for its fine Regency architecture and gracious spa towns, and Lodge Park was built in keeping with this affluent lifestyle.
Mary Arden's House And Countryside Museum
The farmhouse at Wilmcote, just three miles outside Stratford-upon-Avon, the home of William Shakespeare's mother, is now a countryside museum; devoted to showing country life from Tudor times to the present day.
Melbourne Hall
In its picturesque poolside setting, Melbourne Hall was once the home of Victorian Prime Minister, William Lamb, who as 2nd Viscount Melbourne, gave his name to the famous city in Australia.
Middleton Hall
The Hall has an interesting architectural history with its earliest buildings dating from c.1300 and other buildings dating from the sixteenth century and the early nineteenth century.
Moccas Court
Built by Anthony Keck in 1775 overlooking the River Wye, decoration including the round room and oval stair by Robert Adam.Now run as exclusive country house guests accommodation, see website
Moseley Old Hall
The old redbrick Elizabethan farmhouse known as Moseley Old Hall has seen many historic events during its 400-year history. Built by merchant Henry Pitt in 1600.
Moseley Old Hall - A National Trust Property
This atmospheric, Elizabethan farmhouse has amazing stories to tell about what life was like in the 17th century.
Nash's House and New Place
At the end of Chapel Street, you will find the beautiful old building from the sixteenth century, known as Nash's House. In the garden, you can see the foundations of New Place - Shakespeare's fine house.
Newark Park
Built as a hunting lodge around 1550, this tall, symmetrical building with its mullioned windows reflects the sophisticated style of the Elizabethan court rather than that of a local country house.
Newstead Abbey
Founded as a monastic house in the late twelfth century, Newstead became the Byron family seat in 1540. Newstead's most famous owner, the poet Lord Byron, sold the property in 1818.
Nottingham Castle Museum and Art Gallery
The Duke of Newcastle built his new Ducal Palace between 1674-9, it still dominates the Castle Rock to this day. It was restored in 1878 as one of the first provincial museums of fine art.
Owlpen Manor
Owlpen Manor and Gardens is closed for restoration during the 2010 and 2011 seasons.
Packwood House
Packwood House, with its showcase gardens, is a splendid Tudor House which has gone full circle from being thoroughly modernized over the centuries to being restored to its Tudor grandeur.
Pickford's House Museum
Pickford's House, a Grade One listed building, was built in 1770 by architect Joseph Pickford as his family home and work premises.
Ragley Hall
Ragley is the Family home of the 9th Marquess and Marchioness of Hertford, seat of the Conway-Seymour family. Designed in 1680 by Robert Hooke.
Rodmarton Manor
Rodmarton Manor, near Cirencester in Gloucestershire, was one of the last country houses to be built in the old traditional style when everything was done by hand with local stone, local timber and local craftsmen.
Saltram House
Visitors to the classical Georgian mansion of Saltram House may have a strange sense of deja-vu. Saltram was used as Norland Park in the opening scenes of the film of "Sense and Sensibility".
Shipton Hall
Shipton Hall was built around 1587 by Richard Lutwyche to replace a much older, black and white, timbered house which was destroyed by fire earlier in the 16th century.
Snowshill Manor
Few places are more historic than the lovely Tudor buildings which make up Snowshill manor. Beautifully built in local Cotswold stone, the existing modest house was built between the 15th and 18th Century.
Stanford Hall
Stanford, where Shakespeare's Avon flows gently through the Park, has been the home of the Cave family, ancestors of the present owner Lady Braye since 1430.
Stanway House and Fountain
Stanway House, an outstandingly beautiful example of a Jacobean manor house is situated near Winchcombe in the glorious Gloucestershire countryside and is now the setting for a 300ft single jet gravity fountain - the tallest fountain in Britain.
Stanway Water Garden
One of the finest 18th century water gardens, restored in 1998, Stanway lies beneath the 700 foot high Cotswold escarpment. Its grand formal Canal, with 165 foot high fountain , stands on a great grass terrace overlooking the Jacobean manor house.
Stowe Landscape Gardens
One of the first and finest Georgian landscape gardens in Britain, Stowe has over 30 arches and temples mirrored in the waters of lakes or silhouetted against the sky. The garden and park were created by the Temple family during a two hundred year period.
Sudbury Hall
The ideal family day out - an intriguing house, an entertaining museum and a restful garden.
Sudeley Castle Gardens & Exhibitions
Award winning gardens and medieval ruins surround Sudeley Castle, which sits nestled in the Cotswold Hills on the edge of the historic town of Winchcombe.
Sulgrave Manor
Sulgrave Manor is a superb example of a modest manor and garden of the time of Shakespeare, and was home to the ancestors of George Washington.
The Ancient High House
Stafford's Ancient High House has been one of the most important buildings of the town for over four hundred years. Its late Elizabethan architecture makes it particularly distinctive among its 20th century neighbours.
The Workhouse
Although the name of the National Trust usually conjures up pictures of stately homes and gardens, the Workhouse is equally worthy of a visit.
Upton House & Gardens
Upton House is a late seventeenth century house, built of the mellow local stone, which was remodelled by Walter Samuel, 2nd Viscount Bearstead, after his purchase of the property in 1927.
Walcot Hall
Walcot Hall dates back to Tudor times, the original Elizabethan facade being gabled. In 1763, Lord Clive of India commissioned Sir William Chambers, leading architect of the time to redesign the house.
Weston Park
Visit Weston Park, set in the spectacular Shropshire countryside, and you will marvel at the beautiful Seventeenth Century House and the splendour of the 1,000 acre Parkland in which it rests.
Wightwick Manor and Gardens
This fascinating house contains one of the finest collections of William Morris and the Arts and Crafts Movement. Visitors can explore this Victorian masterpiece with its Great Parlour and timber-framed exterior.
Witley Court
One hundred years ago, Witley Court was one of England's great country houses. Today it is a spectacular ruin following a great fire in 1937.
Woburn Abbey
Experience living history at Woburn Abbey, home to the Dukes of Bedford for over 300 years and still home to the 15th Duke and his family today.
Woodchester Mansion
Hidden in a secluded Cotswold valley, untouched by time and the modern world, lies Woodchester Mansion, an unfinished masterpiece of Victorian building.
Wrest Park
Fans of baroque and classical architecture are in for a treat at Wrest Park in Bedfordshire with its French inspired mansion, baroque pavilion and Chinoiserie garden pagoda.

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