Castles and Forts in Wales.

Abergavenny Museum & Castle
Abergavenny Museum presents the story of this historic market town from Prehistoric and Roman times right through to the present day.
Beaumaris Castle
Beaumaris is a great, unfinished masterpiece. It was built as one of the North Wales "iron ring" of castles by the English Monarch, Edward 1, to stamp his authority on the Welsh, but it was never finished.
Caernarfon Castle
King Edward I intended this castle to be a royal residence and seat of government for North Wales. The castle's symbolic status was emphasized when Edward made sure that his son, the first English Prince of Wales, was born here in 1284.
Caerphilly Castle
Caerphilly Castle effortlessly dominates the town of Caerphilly. It sprawls over a huge area (30 acres in all) making it the biggest in Wales.
Caldicot Castle & Country Park
Magnificent Welsh border castle set in fifty-five acres of beautiful parkland. Founded by the Normans, developed in royal hands as a stronghold in the Middle Ages.
Cardiff Castle
Located in the heart of the Welsh capital, Cardiff Castle enjoys 2000 years of history. In the 19th Century, the Castle was transformed into a carved and gilded fantasy by eccentric architect William Burges.
Carew Castle and Tidal Mill
Carew is one of the few castles to display the development from Norman fortification to Elizabethan country house. There is evidence of a much earlier settlement, dating back perhaps some 2,000 years.
Carreg Cennen Castle
There are few castles in Wales which can boast a more spectacular location than Carreg Cennen. Its stout, weatherbeaten ruins crown a precipitous limestone crag overlooking the remote Black Mountain.
Castell Coch
Castell Coch is a late nineteenth-century fairytale-style castle, built on medieval remains.
Chepstow Castle
Chepstow Castle, on its rock above the swirling waters of the River Wye, stands guard over a strategic crossing point into Wales.
Cilgerran Castle
Cilgerran's towers appear amongst woods on the rim of a steep gorge in the Teifi Valley. The timeworn, beautifully located castle has a romantic air.
Conwy Castle
This gritty dark-stoned fortress has the rare ability to evoke an authentic medieval atmosphere. Conceived and created in just four years, Conwy Castle remains one of the outstanding achievements of medieval military architecture.
Criccieth Castle
Criccieth Castle, standing on its headland between two beaches, is a prominent north Wales landmark.
Denbigh Castle
The striking ruins of Denbigh Castle, crowning a steep hill above the town, enjoy commanding views of the pastoral Vale of Clwyd and the round backed hills of the Clwydian Range.
Dinefwr Park & Newton House
Dinefwr Park and Castle is a very special and beautiful place. Now, thanks to a £5 million, three-year project the Park is being transformed and is getting even better!
Dolwyddelan Castle
In a land of castles, Dolwyddelan stands apart not as a stronghold erected by Norman or English forces but as a fortress of the native Welsh princes.
Harlech Castle
Spectacularly sited Harlech Castle seems to grow naturally from the rock on which it is perched. Like an all-seeing sentinel, it gazes out across land and sea, keeping a watchful eye over Snowdonia.
Kidwelly Castle
This castle is one of Wales's best kept secrets. Kidwelly, on a steep bluff overlooking the River Gwendraeth, presents a vision of medieval times.
Laugharne Castle
The handsome castle, standing foursquare on the waterfront overlooking the Taf estuary, bears testament to a troubled past when the Normans built a string of coastal strongholds to consolidate their hold over south-west Wales.
Oxwich Castle
This "castle by the sea" stands in a lovely spot on a wooded headland above Oxwich Bay on the Gower Peninsular. It is a castle in name only. Although probably occupying the site of an early fortification.
Pembroke Castle
Pembroke Castle is one of the largest castles in Wales. It was not a royal castle but the possession of a private lord - his residence and the administrative centre of his territories.
Penrhyn Castle
Built for the wealthy Pennant family on the profits of Welsh slate and Jamaican sugar, Penrhyn Castle is an extravagant example of early 19th century neo-Norman architecture.
Raglan Castle
Handsome Raglan, set amongst green, rolling border country, marks the end of an auspicious line. Largely the creation of the more peaceful, later Middle Ages, it brings to a close the great castle-building episode in Welsh history.
Rhuddlan Castle
Rhuddlan may not be as well known as some of the north Wales castles, yet it shares much in common with its illustrious neighbours Caernarfon and Conwy.
Segontium Roman Fort
Overlooking the Menai Strait, Segontium Roman Fort dates back to circa AD77, when Caesar Julius Agricola completed the Roman conquest of Wales by capturing the Isle of Anglesey.
Tretower Court and Castle
A visit to Tretower Court and Castle reveals two historic sites for the price of one. In open country against the backdrop of the Brecon Beacons stands a stark, round tower and its companion piece - a handsome stone manor house.
Weobley Castle
This unusual historic site has one of the most atmospheric locations in Wales. It stands in a lonely spot on the low-lying northern coast of the Gower peninsular, overlooking an eerie, bleak expanse of saltings and marshland.
White Castle
This little-known historical gem is located deep in Wales's border country, today a tranquil landscape but in medieval times hotly disputed territory. Along with Skenfrith and Grosmont, White Castle was one of a triangle of fortresses.

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